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I'm trying to figure out some Bash-foo to check that the output of three different commands is identical. I can do this with several lines of a Bash script, I'm just wondering if what I want to do is possible in one line with some fancy shell I/O redirection.

What I want to do is check that an SSL certificate matches up with a particular key and certificate signing request.

The commands look like this:

openssl x509 -noout -modulus -in certificate.crt | openssl md5
openssl rsa -noout -modulus -in privateKey.key | openssl md5
openssl req -noout -modulus -in CSR.csr | openssl md5

If the key, cert, and csr match up, all three of those commands should spit out identical output, like: "(stdin)= 95ce143e8418cf8a4f7dd718983ed4eb".

Here's a prototype:

[[ $(echo -e "blah\nblah\nblah" | uniq | wc -l) -eq 1 ]]

But I can't get from there to the final product. This doesn't work:

[[ $(openssl x509 -noout -modulus -in certificate.crt | openssl md5 && openssl rsa -noout -modulus -in privateKey.key | openssl md5 && openssl req -noout -modulus -in CSR.csr | openssl md5 | uniq | wc -l) -eq 1 ]]

One problem is maybe that my prototype generates all three lines of output from one command, but the real thing uses && a couple times.

share|improve this question
    
You might want to ask this on SuperUser.stackexchange.com – Nathaniel Ford Jun 6 '12 at 0:08
    
For what it's worth, the question looks like a reasonable Stackoverflow question to me. (One might take this one to either site. Then again, I like bash-fu.) – thb Jun 6 '12 at 0:13
up vote 5 down vote accepted

cmp -s <( cmd1) <(cmd2) && cmp -s <( cmd1) <(cmd3)

Note that this construct executes cmd1 two times.

If you require single exec of each cmd, more complicated line would look something like:

cmd1|tee >( cmp -s <(cmd2) )|cmp -s <(cmd3)

Also for the second one, checking the result is complicated (you have to check PIPESTATUS array)

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1  
Nice! Will you explain <( ... )? I've seen that here but I don't understand it. – Adam Monsen Jun 6 '12 at 0:19
2  
cmd1 <( cmd2) creates temp FIFO(named pipe) file and puts the stdout of cmd2 in the FIFO, and the FIFO file is arg of cmd1 – Op De Cirkel Jun 6 '12 at 0:22
    
you can find more in the bash manual page (look for named pipe) – Op De Cirkel Jun 6 '12 at 0:24
2  
if you're gonna be using cmp then you should also have diff3 installed (both part of diffutils), so you can simply do: diff3 -A <(cmd1) <(cmd2) <(cmd3) && echo 'match' – c00kiemon5ter Jun 6 '12 at 1:17
    
@c00kiemon5ter diff3 is good tool for this purpose too, but not a POSIX standard, cmp is – Op De Cirkel Jun 6 '12 at 1:20

The problem is that you're piping only the last command "sub-pipeline" into uniq. Try this:

[[ $( { openssl x509 -noout -modulus -in certificate.crt | openssl md5 && openssl rsa -noout -modulus -in privateKey.key | openssl md5 && openssl req -noout -modulus -in CSR.csr | openssl md5; } | uniq | wc -l) -eq 1 ]]

The curly braces make the three "sub-pipelines" act as if together they are one command as far as uniq is concerned, analogously to your echo prototype.

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You probably meant something like

((1 == $( ( echo 1 && sleep 1; echo 1 && sleep 1) | sort -u | wc -l ) ))

But it might be easier to do

x1=$( command1 )
x2=$( command2 )
x3=$( command3 )

if [[ $x1 == $x2 && $x2 == $x3 ]] ; then
    echo The same.
fi

Edit: This form should work as well, but reduce the number of stored variables.

x1=$(command1)
[[ $x1 == $(command2) && $x1 == $(command3) ]] && echo match
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for using only shell builtins, but only the first VAR is needed. The other commands can compare directly to it. – technosaurus Jun 6 '12 at 0:48

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