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I am trying to figure out the proper way to set up fields of my JavaScript object using prototype.

I can use the following:

function myData() {};
myData.prototype.a = null;
myData.prototype.b = null;
myData.prototype.c = null;

var data = new myData();
data.a = 1;
data.b = 2;
data.c = 3;

But, this does not seem to follow proper protocol for encapsulation.

Or, I can do as follows:

function myData() {
    this._a = null;
    this._b = null;
    this._c = null;
};

myData.prototype.__defineGetter__("a", function() {
    return this._a;
});

myData.prototype.__defineSetter__("a", function(val) {
        this._a = val;
});

This method seems overkill when my getters are just returning the private variable's value and not doing anything with it.

Also, is it correct to set the values to null in the constructor if I don't have the values until later? i.e. - I set them later.

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2  
FYI, you often do NOT need to initialize something to null. If one tries to read the value myData.a and a has not been initialized, the reader will just get undefined which often works just as well as null. The test if (myData.a) works the same whether a was initialized to null or not inititalized at all. –  jfriend00 Jun 6 '12 at 0:59
    
I like to initialize my variables, but just for documentation purposes. But its just a matter of preferences. –  Chango Jun 6 '12 at 1:03
    
BTW, per Javascript coding conventions, you should capitalize the first letter of your constructor (MyData vs. myData) to differentiate between constructors and procedural functions. –  Joseph Silber Jun 6 '12 at 1:11
    
Do you need encapsulation or not? You seem to be unsatisfied both with and without it. Are your attributes public or strict private? –  Bergi Jun 6 '12 at 1:22

2 Answers 2

am trying to figure out the proper way to set up fields of my JavaScript object

You should define what you mean by "proper".

>  var data = new myData();
>  data.a = 1;
>  data.b = 2;
>  data.c = 3; 

In the above, you are adding a, b and c properties to the data object, you aren't modifying the value of myData.prototype.a (i.e. data[[Prototype]].a), etc.

But, this does not seem to follow proper protocol for encapsulation.

You should explain what you mean by that, i.e., what you think the above should achieve.

[ snip __defineGetter__, __defineSetter__ code ]

This method seems overkill when my getters are just returning the private variable's value

"Private" variables, in the classic sense, don't exist in ECMAScript. You can emulate them with closures though. Have a look at the module pattern.

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JavaScript is a dynamic language, if you strictly don't need to encapsulate those properties you don't have to. Therefore the first example is perfectly fine.

Otherwise, if you need to encapsulate them, and you're in a ES5 compliant environment, you should use get and set, because __defineGetter__ and __defineSetter__ are deprecated and not standard (see: https://developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Object/DefineGetter and https://developer.mozilla.org/en/Core_JavaScript_1.5_Guide/Working_with_Objects#Defining_getters_and_setters)

An example:

function MyData() {
    // set to the prototype's value
    var a = this.a;
    var b = this.b;
    var c = this.c;

    Object.defineProperties(this, { 
        "a": {
            get : function(){ return a; },
            set : function(value) { a = value }
         },
         "b": {
            get : function(){ return b; },
            set : function(value) { b = value }
         },
         "c": {
            get : function(){ return c; },
            set : function(value) { c = value }
         }
    });
};

MyData.prototype.a = null;
MyData.prototype.b = null;
MyData.prototype.c = null;

See Object.defineProperties

share|improve this answer
    
Why are you assigning each (a,b,c) variable to a corresponding "this.", e.g - var a = this.a; Couldn't you just leave it as var a; instead of assigning a to this.a ? –  Drake Amara Jun 6 '12 at 19:13
    
As I wrote in the comment, I set each variables with the corresponding prototype's value. In that way, if you do: alert(new MyData().a) you will get null that is the default value in the prototype. Otherwise, you will get undefined, and that is not consistent. In addition, in this way, if you change the prototype values with some other default value (e.g. a string) you don't have to change the constructor, the new value will be inherit automatically. –  ZER0 Jun 6 '12 at 19:30
    
I see - thanks. –  Drake Amara Jun 6 '12 at 22:30

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