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This has me scratching my head and my classmates' heads for a while now. This is a program that uses a function and two arrays from main, the core array has a string that has a block of junk data with hidden binary digits in every line of code, and the data string needs to filter out the junk.

There are special characters that also need to be passed through to the data string including SKP and RPT (repeat the amount of times this line is stored by the numbers following the word) as well as of course any numeric characters (ascii code 48-57) that follow the RPT phrase. Unprintable or 'special' characters need to be discarded.

Using the logic below, I can't figure out why my filters aren't working.
What's happening is that in the main function, there is a tester that compares your function to the correct ending phrase. The original core data string has something like 954 characters, and after everything correct is deleted, the data string should have a size of 41 characters. My variable M can be used as a post-function counter of how many characters are left in my filtered data string once the information is passed, and it doesn't go down below 600.

I'm assuming the segmentation fault is due to data being declared in main as an array with a size of 41 characters. I cannot modify main by any means and must use the function prototype as it was given to me. I have initialized m to 0 at the start of my function when I was declaring the rest of my variables and its only purpose was to be used as another arbitrary indicator of where the string position in order to fill it with the appropriate filtered data, the same as any variable you would use for for loop iterations.

Any random printf statements were simply used to try and debug and are not relevant to the code.

The code is below:

int bit_to_ascii(const char core[], char data[])
{
    int len = 0, i, binc = 0, m = 0, len2 = 0,
    b = 0, n = 0, j = 0, p = 0, s = 0, rdec = 0, num1 = 0, num2 = 0;
    char bdata[9], ctrans=1;

    bdata[0] = '\0';
    len = strlen(core);

    for (i = 0; i<len; i++)
    {
        if (core[i] == '0' || core[i] == '1' && binc < 8)
        {
            // printf("%d\n",m);
            bdata[binc++] = core[i];
        }
        printf("%d/n",m);

        if (core[i] == 'R' && core[i + 1] == 'P' && core[i + 2] == 'T')
        {
            printf("B\n");
            if (core[i + 3] > 47 && core[i + 3] < 58 && core[i + 4] > 47 && core[i + 4] < 58)
            {
                num1 = core[i + 3] - '0';
                num2 = core[i + 4] - '0';
                rdec = num1 * 10 + num2;
                i += 5;
            }
            else
            {
                //printf("\n\nHere? 4\n\n");
                rdec = core[i + 3] - '0';
                i += 4;
            }

            if (binc < 8)
            {
                // printf("\n\nIncrement shortage if statmennt\n\n");
                i += 2;

                for (p = binc; p < 8; p++)
                {
                    // printf("for loop to add in 0s to binary array\n\n");
                    bdata[p] = '0';
                }
                binc = 8;
                bdata[9] = '\0';
            }    
        }

        if (rdec > 0)
        {
            printf("\n\nC\n\n");

            if (bdata[0] != '\0')
            {
                ctrans = strtol(bdata, NULL, 2);
                bdata[0] = '\0';
            }


            for (b = 1; b < rdec; b++, m++)
            {
                // printf("\n\nHere? 6\n\n");
                data[m] = ctrans;
            }

            rdec = 0;
            binc = 0;
            ctrans = 1;
            // m = n;
        }

        if (binc == 8)
        {
            // printf("\n\nhere? 7\n\n");
            bdata[9] = '\0';
            binc = 0;
            j = 0;
        }

        if (core[i] == 'S' && core[i + 1] == 'K' && core[i + 2] == 'P')
        {
            // printf("\n\nhere? 8\n\n");
            for (s = 0; s < 8; s++)
            {
                // printf("\n\nsofat\n\n");
                bdata[s] = '\0';
            }
        }

        if (bdata[0] != '\0')
        {
            ctrans = strtol(bdata, NULL, 2);
            bdata[0] = '\0';
        }

        if (ctrans > 31 && ctrans <= 127)
        {
            // printf("\n\nctrans condition is here\n\n");
            data[m] = ctrans;
            m++;
        }

        len2 = strlen(data);
        // printf("\n\n m: %d\n ctrains is: %c\n len is:%d\n rdec is: %d\n binc is: %d\n"
                  " n is: %d\n i is: %d\n\n", m, ctrans, len, rdec, binc, n, i);
    }
    data[m] = '\0';
    return strlen(data) + 1;
}
share|improve this question
8  
lol at the mental image of you scratching your classmate's head –  David Grayson Jun 6 '12 at 1:19
2  
Did you try running it through lint? –  JoelFan Jun 6 '12 at 1:27
    
Have you used a real debugger (not printf statements)? –  JoelFan Jun 6 '12 at 1:29
    
I'm using a standard terminal program from ubuntu, I don't have lint as an editing tool from my linux command line. –  learnenburn Jun 6 '12 at 1:57
    
Slightly more readable now.. In the future, 4 space indentation please. Not 8, not 6 not 3, not tabs, 4 spaces :-) Also consistency is nice. –  UpAndAdam Oct 22 '13 at 19:53

1 Answer 1

bdata[9] is past the end of the char array you declared.

Declaring bdata[9] creates the indices bdata[0] through bdata[8].

Also: you are accessing core[] outside its bounds too.

here

 len = strlen(core);
 for (i = 0; i<len; i++)
 {
 ...
  if ( core[i+3] ??? // if i == len -1 you are screwed
share|improve this answer
    
bdata is the array I'm using to temporarily store the 8 necessary binary digits from every line filtered from core. ctrans is the array I'm using to temporarily store the converted ascii character from the decimal result of the strtol function before passing that character onto the data array. –  learnenburn Jun 6 '12 at 1:54
    
Yes I see that. when you declare bdata[9] you have 9 chars with your last one being the '\0' but you tried to assign bdata[9] = '\0' when you meant bdata[8] = '\0'. This is that case with 90% of seg faults you will have. Accessing an array out side of its bounds. –  corn3lius Jun 6 '12 at 2:16
    
That correction makes sense, many thanks! Unfortunately, the seg fault is still present... –  learnenburn Jun 6 '12 at 20:10
    
I set i to <=len, and how can it be outside of the bounds? It's a nested condition that is coursing through 953 characters - is it not logically feasible that I can skip ahead by 3 or 4 characters should certain conditions be true? –  learnenburn Jun 7 '12 at 22:18
    
yes it is feasible... but if the for loop's i=952 and you try to access core[i+3] or core[955] that is out of bounds and a seg fault. –  corn3lius Jun 8 '12 at 0:49

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