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I am trying to write a program with a function double_product(vector<double> a, vector<double> b) that computes the scalar product of two vectors. The scalar product is

$a_{0}b_{0}+a_{1}b_{1}+...+a_{n-1}b_{n-1}$.

Here is what I have. It is a mess, but I am trying!

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

class Scalar_product
{
    public:
    Scalar_product(vector<double> a, vector<double> b);
};
double scalar_product(vector<double> a, vector<double> b)
{
    double product = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i <= a.size()-1; i++)
        for (int i = 0; i <= b.size()-1; i++)
            product = product + (a[i])*(b[i]);
    return product;
}

int main() {
    cout << product << endl;
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
1  
Is there actually a question here? –  Michael Anderson Jun 6 '12 at 4:07
    
What is "bouble"? –  jakebird451 Jun 6 '12 at 4:07
    
You question is not very clear. We get it that its your homework. But what question are you are trying to solve and add a little detail about what problem you are facing? –  Ankit Jun 6 '12 at 4:08
    
@jakebird451 I meant "double" sorry. –  HowardRoark Jun 6 '12 at 4:09
    
You are trying to construct a class for a scalar product? Shouldn't this be a function or a method of a custom mathematical vector class? Your constructor should not return an double. –  jakebird451 Jun 6 '12 at 4:11

5 Answers 5

Unless you need to do this on your own (e.g., writing it is homework), you should really use the standard algorithm that's already written to do exactly what you want:

#include <numeric>

int main() { 
    double a[] = {1, 2, 3};
    double b[] = {4, 5, 6};

    std::cout << "The scalar product is: " 
              << std::inner_product(begin(a), end(a), begin(b), 0.0);
    return 0;
}

Note that while the begin(a), end(a) is new in C++11, std::inner_product has been available since C++98.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for teaching me about inner_product. –  Mark B Jun 6 '12 at 4:58

You can delete the class you have defined. You don't need it.

In your scalar_product function:

double scalar_product(vector<double> a, vector<double> b)
{
    double product = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i <= a.size()-1; i++)
        for (int i = 0; i <= b.size()-1; i++)
            product = product + (a[i])*(b[i]);
    return product;
}

It's almost there. You don't need 2 loops. Just one.

double scalar_product(vector<double> a, vector<double> b)
{
    if( a.size() != b.size() ) // error check
    {
        puts( "Error a's size not equal to b's size" ) ;
        return -1 ;  // not defined
    }

    // compute
    double product = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i <= a.size()-1; i++)
       product += (a[i])*(b[i]); // += means add to product
    return product;
}

Now to call this function, you need to create 2 vector objects in your main(), fill them with values, (the same number of values of course!) and then call scalar_product( first_vector_that_you_create, second_vector_object );

share|improve this answer
    
The error handling in this implementation is dangerous. -1 does not stand for undefined in the scalar product. That one may very well appear sometimes. There is a warning printed out there, but this can easily be disregarded, especially for large programs where text the text output may be hidden, or if there are a lot of printed text. Try instead numeric_limits<double>::quiet_NaN(); Which return nan. –  patrik Jan 30 '14 at 18:01
1  
I would never, ever, ever, voluntarily introduce NaN into my program. NaN is toxic (NaN*number=NaN, NaN+number=NaN), so it propagates throughout your program, and figuring out where the NaN was produced is actually hard (unless your debugger can break immediately on NaN production). That said, a mysterious -1 might not easy to track as a mysterious 0, so I might change that -1 to a 0. If you don't monitor the text output of your program regularly, I'd probably also add an ASSERT into that condition. But never return NaN. –  bobobobo Feb 18 '14 at 10:34
    
Tracking a NaN that was not the result of a division operation I would expect to be doubly hard. –  bobobobo Feb 18 '14 at 10:35
    
Well, it would be much more dangerous to add a value that may occur by a correct operation. Then you may not even know there is an error there, however, by adding a number that is not allowed like nan, may cause an error or exception later, which let the user know something is wrong. However, adding an ASSERT is probably better, +1 –  patrik Feb 18 '14 at 11:22

You seem to want to make a class specifically for vectors. The class I made in my example is tailored to 3 dimensional vectors, but you can change it to another if desired. The class holds i,j,k but also can conduct a scalar products based on other MathVectors. The other vector is passed in via a C++ reference. It is hard to deduce what the question was, but I think this might answer it.

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class MathVector
{
private:
    double i,j,k;
public:
    MathVector(double i,double j,double k)
    {
        this->i=i;
        this->j=j;
        this->k=k;
    }
    double getI(){return i;}
    double getJ(){return j;}
    double getK(){return k;}
    double scalar(MathVector &other)
    {
        return (i*other.getI())+(j*other.getJ())+(k*other.getK());
    }
};

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    MathVector a(1,2,5), b(2,4,1);

    cout << a.scalar(b) << endl;

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

Here is the code that you should have. I see you have used class in your code, which you do not really need here. Let me know if the question required you to use class.

As you are new and this code might scare you. So, I will try to explain this as I go. Look for comments in the code to understand what is being done and ask if you do not understand.

//Scalar.cpp
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

/**
This function returns the scalar product of two vectors "a" and "b"
*/
double scalar_product(vector<double> a, vector<double> b)
{
    //In C++, you should declare every variable before you use it. So, you declare product and initialize it to 0.
    double product = 0;
    //Here you check whether the two vectors are of equal size. If they are not then the vectors cannot be multiplied for scalar product.
    if(a.size()!=b.size()){
        cout << "Vectors are not of the same size and hence the scalar product cannot be calculated" << endl;
        return -1;  //Note: This -1 is not the answer, but just a number indicating that the product is not possible. Some pair of vectors might actually have a -1, but in that case you will not see the error above.
    }

    //you loop through the vectors. As bobo also pointed you do not need two loops.
    for (int i = 0; i < a.size(); i++)
    {
        product = product + a[i]*b[i];
    }

    //finally you return the product
    return product;
}


 //This is your main function that will be executed before anything else.
int main() {
    //you declare two vectors "veca" and "vecb" of length 2 each
    vector<double> veca(2);
    vector<double> vecb(2);

    //put some random values into the vectors
    veca[0] = 1.5;
    veca[1] = .7;
    vecb[0] = 1.0;
    vecb[1] = .7;

    //This is important! You called the function you just defined above with the two parameters as "veca" and "vecb". I hope this cout is simple!
    cout << scalar_product(veca,vecb) << endl;
}

If you are using an IDE then just compile and run. If you are using command-line on a Unix-based system with g++ compiler, this is what you will do (where Scalar.cpp is the file containing code):

g++ Scalar.cpp -o scalar

To run it simply type

./scalar

You should get 1.99 as the output of the above program.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, I appreciate your help :D –  HowardRoark Jun 7 '12 at 8:51

While you have been presented many solutions that work, let me spin up another variation to introduce a couple of concepts that should help you writing better code:

  • class are only needed to pack data together
  • a function should check its preconditions as soon as possible, those should be documented
  • a function should have postconditions, those should be documented
  • code reuse is the cornerstone of maintenable programs

With that in mind:

// Takes two vectors of the same size and computes their scalar product
// Returns a positive value
double scalar_product(std::vector<double> const& a, std::vector<double> const& b)
{
    if (a.size() != b.size()) { throw std::runtime_error("different sizes"); }

    return std::inner_product(a.begin(), a.end(), b.begin(), 0.0);
} // scalar_product

You could decide to use the inner_product algorithm directly but let's face it:

  • it requires four arguments, not two
  • it does not check for its arguments being of the same size

so it's better to wrap it.

Note: I used const& to indicate to the compiler not to copy the vectors.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! I really appreciate it. –  HowardRoark Jun 7 '12 at 8:52

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