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Why is

1 January 1970 00:00:00

considered the epoch time?

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3  
Not sure why anyone thought this was subjective. 'Epoch' time is a standard time-stamping scheme. –  ConcernedOfTunbridgeWells Jul 7 '09 at 8:40
    
n.b. this question was posted by @phoenix, I just corrected the grammar. –  Matt Howells Jul 7 '09 at 9:24
    
Thanks @Matt..... –  rahul Jul 7 '09 at 9:25
79  
The universe was created on Jan 1, 1970. Anyone who tells you otherwise is clearly lying. –  ijw Jul 7 '09 at 23:52
2  
We should start counting time since this date, so we are now on year 44. –  Leonardo Raele Apr 28 at 21:00

4 Answers 4

up vote 122 down vote accepted

Early versions of unix measured system time in 1/60 s intervals. This meant that a 32-bit unsigned integer could only represent a span of time less than 829 days. For this reason, the time represented by the number 0 (called the epoch) had to be set in the very recent past. As this was in the early 1970s, the epoch was set to 1971-1-1.

Later, the system time was changed to increment every second, which increased the span of time that could be represented by a 32-bit unsigned integer to around 136 years. As it was no longer so important to squeeze every second out of the counter, the epoch was rounded down to the nearest decade, thus becoming 1970-1-1. One must assume that this was considered a bit neater than 1971-1-1.

Note that a 32-bit signed integer using 1970-1-1 as its epoch can represent dates up to 2038-1-19, on which date it will wrap around to 1901-12-13.

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6  
Does 1/60 have anything to do with the frequency of the American power net? –  xtofl Jul 7 '09 at 9:23
18  
It's the frequency of one of the oscillators on the system boards used at the time. It wasn't necessary for the oscillator to be 60Hz since it ran on DC, but it was probably cheap to use whatever was most common at the time, and TVs were being mass-produced then... –  Matt Howells Jul 7 '09 at 10:32
8  
Actually, at the time, it was very common for computer clocks as well as RTCs to be synchronised with the US mains waveform because it was (is?) very reliable. It was multiplied to get the processor clock, and divided to get seconds for the RTC. –  Alexios Jun 17 '12 at 21:03
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@MattHowells - why don't they upgrade the epoch to 2000 ? –  Jedi Knight Mar 17 '13 at 9:10
18  
End of the world party scheduled for 2038-1-19 my place. Who's comin with me?!? –  mafiOSo Nov 13 '13 at 22:59

History.

The earliest versions of Unix time had a 32-bit integer incrementing at a rate of 60 Hz, which was the rate of the system clock on the hardware of the early Unix systems. The value 60 Hz still appears in some software interfaces as a result. The epoch also differed from the current value. The first edition Unix Programmer's Manual dated November 3, 1971 defines the Unix time as "the time since 00:00:00, Jan. 1, 1971, measured in sixtieths of a second".

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1  
Epoch time is 1 January 1970, not 1 January 1971. –  Steve Harrison Jul 7 '09 at 7:56
34  
@Steve: Historically, he's right, you're wrong. ;-) –  Stobor Jul 7 '09 at 8:13

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unix_time#History explains a little about the origins of Unix time and the chosen epoch. The definition of unix time and the epoch date went through a couple of changes before stabilizing on what it is now.

But it does not say why exactly 1/1/1970 was chosen in the end.

Notable excerpts from the Wikipedia page:

The first edition Unix Programmer's Manual dated November 3, 1971 defines the Unix time as "the time since 00:00:00, Jan. 1, 1971, measured in sixtieths of a second".

Because of [the] limited range, the epoch was redefined more than once, before the rate was changed to 1 Hz and the epoch was set to its present value.

Several later problems, including the complexity of the present definition, result from Unix time having been defined gradually by usage rather than fully defined to start with.

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Short answer: Why not?

Longer answer: The time itself doesn't really matter, as long as everyone who uses it agrees on its value. As 1/1/70 has been in use for so long, using it will make you code as understandable as possible for as many people as possible.

There's no great merit in choosing an arbitrary epoch just to be different.

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But why 1970 is chosen as the year. –  rahul Jul 7 '09 at 7:43
22  
Because Unix was developed in 1969 and first released in 1971 and it was thus reasonable to assume that no machine would have to represent a system time earlier than 1970-01-01-00:00:00. –  Jörg W Mittag Jul 7 '09 at 7:57
1  
As a developer of historical simulation games, it seems pretty silly that the designers of some time objects tend to assume all programs will only want to represent dates in the future or recent past. Of course, we can program our own representations, or work in an adjustment factor, but still. –  Dronz Feb 6 '13 at 22:51
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The same pre-epoch issue applies to "practical" non-game uses, such as business spreadsheets, scientific data presentation, time machine UIs, etc. –  Lenoxus Mar 3 at 15:51

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