Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

C#:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            int a = 11;
            int b = 2;
            a -= b -= a -= b += b -= a;
            System.Console.WriteLine(a);
        }
    }
}

Output:27

C++:

#include "stdafx.h"
#include<iostream>

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
       int a = 11;
       int b = 2;
       a -= b -= a -= b += b -= a;
       std::cout<<a<<std::endl;
       return 0;
}

Output:76

Same code has differernt output, can somebody tell why is this so ? Help appreciated!!

share|improve this question
15  
What is this obsession with asking questions about things that are clearly undefined behavior. Even if the behavior is defined in C#, the code is just silly. –  leppie Jun 6 '12 at 6:16
2  
Who said that values should be same? –  Nikhil Agrawal Jun 6 '12 at 6:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 14 down vote accepted

In C# your code is well defined and is equivalent to the following:

a = a - (b = b - (a = a - (b = b + (b = b - a))));

The innermost assignments are not relevant here because the assigned value is never used before the variable is reassigned. This code has the same effect:

a = a - (b = b - (a - (b + (b - a))));

This is roughly the same as:

a = a - (b = (b * 3) - (a * 2));

Or even simpler:

b = (b * 3) - (a * 2);
a -= b;

However, in C++ your code gives undefined behaviour. There is no guarantee at all about what it will do.

share|improve this answer
7  
Absolutely correct. The short answer: C# != C != C++. The longer answer: requires an understanding of "sequence points" –  paulsm4 Jun 6 '12 at 6:15
1  
@paulsm4 an important note though is that C is a subset of C++, C++ is not a subset of C#. –  chacham15 Jun 6 '12 at 6:28
14  
@chacham15 No, C is not a subset of C++. For example, int a; int a; is valid C, but invalid C++. –  fredoverflow Jun 6 '12 at 6:31
    
@FredOverflow is that the only difference? it just seems like such a nitpick to point that out. –  chacham15 Jun 7 '12 at 21:36
2  
@chacham15 No, of course not, tentative definitions are just one of many examples. –  fredoverflow Jun 8 '12 at 8:34

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.