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I've been asking myself this question for a while now and cannot find any good advice on the web. We're running database servers with SQL Server 2008 R2.

We're developping applications that can be translated into french, german, italian and english.

Now, if I would like to create a new database from scratch, what would be the best collation in that case ?

I've found documentation on this subject, I know it will change our way of sorting and comparing stuff in our databases but I haven't found any good sources to help us choosing the correct one !

We'be been using FRENCH_CI_AS for a while now, but we do miss a little bit the case sentivity... What would be the best choice for us ?

I've read that many companies use LATIN1_GENERAL_CI_AS, but still no case sensitivity, and I really don't get why they don't take case sensitivity, especially when dealing with languages such as german, which requires case sensitivity ! Are there drawbacks in choosing CS collations ? If so, what are they ?

Edit : What is the best collation to use (in our case) ?

  • LATIN1_GENERAL_CI_AS
  • LATIN1_GENERAL_CS_AS
  • FRENCH_CI_AS
  • FRENCH_CS_AS
  • Another collation that would fit better our languages prerequisities ?

Thanks for your help !

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1 Answer 1

You can set the collation on

  • database level
  • column level, and
  • statement/operation level (comparison, order-by)

(MSDN)

For example, you can define a NVARCHAR column case-insensitive (for search), but apply a case-sensitive collation in the ORDER BY clause of a SELECT statement.

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Thanks for your answer, but in order to start a new database based on a good basis, what would be the best collation to choose for our database engine ! –  Andy M Jun 6 '12 at 6:41

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