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Say I have the following makefile:

TARGETS = a b c

all: $(TARGETS)
    @echo Done.

%.o: %.cpp
    @echo Compiling $@...
    touch $@

%: %.o
    @echo Building $@...
    touch $@

I'd expect that this should have no problem running: the all rule would trigger the %, rule, which would trigger the %.o rule, generates the a.o, b.o, and c.o files, and then the a, b, and c files would finally be generated.

However, running make causes the following output:

ghb@Nemo:~/Downloads$ make
g++     a.cpp   -o a
/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/gcc/x86_64-linux-gnu/4.5.2/../../../crt1.o: In function `_start':
(.text+0x20): undefined reference to `main'
collect2: ld returned 1 exit status
make: *** [a] Error 1

Why is i trying to run g++ all of the sudden? I have no rules for that. Also, running make a.o followed by make a works fine, but running make a causes the behavior as above.

What can I do to prevent make from trying to "come up" with what it believes are suitable commands for a target?

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2 Answers

There are three rules involved here, two that you wrote:

%.o: %.cpp
    @echo Compiling $@...
    touch $@

%: %.o
    @echo Building $@...
    touch $@

and one that is "built in":

%: %.cpp
    $(CXX) $< -o $@     # There's a little more to it, but never mind.

When you try to build a, Make goes through its list of rules and comes up with two candidates:

%: %.o    # yours
%: %.cpp  # built in

If a.o already exists, then your rule takes precedence (which is why your chain works if you make a.o first). If not, then Make chooses the second because a.cpp does exist.

If you don't want Make to consider these built-in rules when building your targets, use make -r, also known as make --no-builtin-rules.

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The last rule seems to be ignored or misunderstood, so make falls back on its implicit rule for cpp files (see Catalogue of Implicit Rules).
It may be worked around with this syntax:

TARGETS := a b c

all: $(TARGETS)
        @echo Done.

%.o: %.cpp
        @echo Compiling $@...
        touch $@

define make_target
$(1): $(1).o
        @echo Building $$@...
        touch $$@
endef
$(foreach tgt, $(TARGETS), $(eval $(call make_target, $(tgt))))

By the way, use make all instead of make or only the first target will be built.

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That's cool! But could you please explain a little bit on what's going on in your solution, and why it works and not mine? –  gablin Jun 6 '12 at 9:41
    
Actually I have no explanation for why the "%: %o" rule is ignored. However if you replace it with "%.exe: %o" (together with each target name) it works! My solution defines a generic rule for each target (with define..endef), and the $(foreach..,$(eval..)) macro expands it for each element of TARGETS (see a description at gnu.org/software/make/manual/make.html#Eval-Function). –  Francois Jun 6 '12 at 11:09
    
... and to answer your initial question, since the "%: %.o" rule is ignored, make falls back on its C++ implicit compilation rule (see gnu.org/software/make/manual/make.html#Catalogue-of-Rules), that's where the surprising g++ invokation comes from. –  Francois Jun 6 '12 at 11:24
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