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I have the following

#!/bin/bash
aprograms=`pgrep a`
echo $aprograms

which outputs:

alejandro@ubuntu:~$ bash test.sh 
2 6 7 8 12 13 16 17 20 27 ...

I want to control if there is a value inside $aprograms. I tryed the following (Which I dont know if its even a valid approach):

if [ $value in $aprograms ];then
    echo "found"

But doesnt work. Is there a correct way to control if there is a value is inside $aprograms?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

you could use bash's parameter expansion.

shopt -s extglob
var="2 6 7 8 12 13 16 17 20 27"
if [ "${var/17?( )/}" != "$var" ] ; then echo "match"; fi
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That would also detect 17 in a string 1177 –  Arsen7 Jun 6 '12 at 7:56
    
use spaces around 17. –  tuxuday Jun 6 '12 at 7:58
1  
Then it would not detect 17 if it happens to be the last or the first value in that string. :) But I like the direction in which your answer is going. –  Arsen7 Jun 6 '12 at 8:02
    
Good find! Edited answer. You should be in QA. –  tuxuday Jun 6 '12 at 8:20
#!/bin/bash

function foo () {
  echo 2 6 7 8 12 13 16 17 20 27
}

function search_value () { 
  for i in $2; do {
    if [ $i -eq $1 ]; then {
      echo "found"
    } fi
  } done
}

search_value 13 "$( foo )"

Just change foo with your input program:

search_value 13 "$( pgrep a )"    
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It's worth remembering that this solution works only for string containing integer values. search_value a "a b c" will throw an error. –  Arsen7 Jun 6 '12 at 8:13
    
That's true, reading question example I've guessed he is working with integers. Some " around variables and using == as operator instead of -eq should work even for strings. –  Alessandro Pezzato Jun 6 '12 at 8:16
    
Yeah. Also I was a little shocked that apparently bash is immune to semicolon injection when I tried to serve it something like search_value 12 "1 ; do; end ; ls ;" :) –  Arsen7 Jun 6 '12 at 8:19
if [[ " $aprograms " =~ \ $value\  ]] ; then
    echo "found"
fi

Also, with grep

if pgrep a | grep -q -w "$value" ; then
    echo "found:
fi
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-eq

is equal to

if [ "$a" -eq "$b" ]
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source –  khaled_webdev Jun 6 '12 at 7:52
    
But the question was about finding an element in something what looks like an array, not about comparing values. –  Arsen7 Jun 6 '12 at 7:53
    
see if this will helping , bash grep results into array –  khaled_webdev Jun 6 '12 at 8:06
    
the solution will a combination of all of this –  khaled_webdev Jun 6 '12 at 8:07

Since pgrep outputs PIDs one per line, you can use grep to find the one you're looking for.

#!/bin/bash
aprograms=$(pgrep a)
echo "$aprograms"
if grep -Fxqs "$value" <<< "$aprograms"
then
    echo "found"
fi

Always quote variables when they are expanded in order to preserve whitespace.

The -F option to grep uses the pattern as a fixed string instead of a regex. The -x option matches the whole line so smaller strings or numbers don't match parts of larger ones. The options -q and -s suppress output and error output. If your version of grep doesn't have these, then use:

if grep -Fx "$value" <<< "$aprograms" > /dev/null >&2
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