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I am seeing a puzzling behavior that I am trying to understand...

sample code.. Please ignore that fact that I am returning a local variable address..

Edit: I am just using this code as an example to understand the gcc's optimization behavior. I don't think the undefined behavior in this sample code changes the gcc's optimization logic. If you think it does, please explain.

    #include<stdio.h>
    char *foo() {
        char arr[] = "hello world is here..\n";
        return arr;
    }

    int main() {
        char *ptr;

        ptr = foo();
        printf("0x%x \n", ptr);
        printf("%s", ptr);
    }

running this in a linux/x86 machine, first printf in main() does print an address.. but 2nd printf doesn't print anything. It looks like gcc somehow optimized out the array initialization.

If I change the foo() like the following, then the string gets printed correctly.. I know its an undefined behavior. But I am interested only in understanding the gcc optimization here.

    char *foo() {
        char arr[] = "hello\n";
        printf("0x%x\n", arr);
        return arr;
    }

In the original code, how is it possible that foo returns an address, but initialization was optimized out ? this is the assembly code.. I am not that familiar with x86 assembly.. what exactly is gcc doing in the two cases ?

            .LC0:
                    .string "hello\n"
                    .text
            .globl foo
                    .type   foo, @function
            foo:
            .LFB2:
                    pushq   %rbp
            .LCFI0:
                    movq    %rsp, %rbp
            .LCFI1:
                    movl    .LC0(%rip), %eax
                    movl    %eax, -16(%rbp)
                    movzwl  .LC0+4(%rip), %eax
                    movw    %ax, -12(%rbp)
                    movzbl  .LC0+6(%rip), %eax
                    movb    %al, -10(%rbp)
                    leaq    -16(%rbp), %rax
                    leave
                    ret
            .LFE2:

and the assembly code of foo() with the additional printf..

            .LC0:
                    .string "hello\n"
            .LC1:
                    .string "0x%x\n"
                    .text
            .globl foo
                    .type   foo, @function
            foo:
            .LFB2:
                    pushq   %rbp
            .LCFI0:
                    movq    %rsp, %rbp
            .LCFI1:
                    subq    $16, %rsp
            .LCFI2:
                    movl    .LC0(%rip), %eax
                    movl    %eax, -16(%rbp)
                    movzwl  .LC0+4(%rip), %eax
                    movw    %ax, -12(%rbp)
                    movzbl  .LC0+6(%rip), %eax
                    movb    %al, -10(%rbp)
                    leaq    -16(%rbp), %rsi
                    movl    $.LC1, %edi
                    movl    $0, %eax
                    call    printf
                    leaq    -16(%rbp), %rax
                    leave
                    ret
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6  
your question sounds like please ignore the fact that I assume unicorns exits, but what is the purpose of the corn? –  UmNyobe Jun 6 '12 at 7:55
1  
The fact that it doesn't print anything just means you're lucky; that probably means that ptr[0] == '\0'. –  Jack Jun 6 '12 at 7:55
1  
You are printing a pointer with %x. If your pointers and unsigned have different width, you have undefined behavior, again. %p is the correct format for void* pointers. –  Jens Gustedt Jun 6 '12 at 9:44
1  
Other error in your code is that your last printf doesn't include a \n so this might be optimized out for just that reason. Voting to close. Please come back with a valid example. –  Jens Gustedt Jun 6 '12 at 9:47
    
@JensGustedt I don't follow with the \n. Why should that be optimized away? I have seen hundreds of programs which just output text without terminating a line. That should not harm. –  glglgl Jun 6 '12 at 11:29
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4 Answers

Please ignore that fact that I am returning a local variable address..

Well as you are also using the value returned by the function, we cannot ignore this. C says your program invokes undefined behavior and the implementation has the right to do anything it wants.

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What happens is easy to explain: You have told the compiler to put some data on the stack, return this address and free it again. So you have the address, but you have no evidence about the content.

After returning from the function, you call printf() twice. First with the task of outputting the given address, then the content it contains.

Until you reach the point of outputting, the stack contents may (and obviously will) be garbled with other stuff. I could imagine that printf() internally needs a certain amount of stack and uses it (=writes to it), corrupting your original content.

Although others are completely right in stating that the said behaviour is undefined, it doesn't harm wondering about why a compiler behaves the way it behaves.


EDIT: In this case, it is not enough to look at the assembly code fpr foo(). Optimization also means that function calls can be replaced by the code which the function contains. After compiling the code myself, it seems that this is the case here. The code for foo is still contained in the object file, but as well inlined in main(). This makes the said array local to main() and it is kept allocated until the end. But as said, it is just coincidence and nothing what can be relied on.

The assembly code looks like that:

.LC1:
    .string "0x%x \n"
.LC2:
    .string "%s"
    .text
    .p2align 4,,15
.globl main
    .type   main, @function
main:
    pushl   %ebp
    movl    %esp, %ebp
    andl    $-16, %esp
    pushl   %ebx
    subl    $60, %esp
    leal    26(%esp), %ebx
    movl    %ebx, 4(%esp)
    movl    $1819043176, 26(%esp)
    movl    $1952784495, 30(%esp)
    movl    $1696607843, 34(%esp)
    movl    $539911028, 38(%esp)
    movl    $778269797, 42(%esp)
    movw    $10, 46(%esp)
    movl    $.LC0, (%esp)
    call    printf
    movl    %ebx, 4(%esp)
    movl    $.LC1, (%esp)
    call    printf
    movl    %ebx, 4(%esp)
    movl    $.LC2, (%esp)
    call    printf
    addl    $60, %esp
    popl    %ebx
    movl    %ebp, %esp
    popl    %ebp
    ret

Here you see - there is no call to your foo(); the data gets written in blocks of 4 bytes to the stack and immediately given to printf.

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+1. I think the last paragraph is misinterpreting the question. What worked (and has to work) is the printf in foo where the array is still alive. –  undur_gongor Jun 6 '12 at 9:24
    
@undur_gongor You are completely right. And not only that: a mere printf("0x%x\n", arr); will in any case output a value, if it is a valid address or not. –  glglgl Jun 6 '12 at 11:27
    
This is right - it is very likely the first printf() call is wiping out the string that foo() stored on the stack. –  caf Jun 6 '12 at 11:56
1  
Thanks. good point about call to printf() itself over-writing the value returned.. but as i said when I print the address of arr in foo(), the contents of arr seem to be retained and gets printed correctly in main. That is why I was trying to understand the assembly code to see if its the gcc optimization that didn't initialize array at all in the first case or may be the undefined behavior in this code is somehow causing what I am seeing.. In a program with undefined behavior one should be able to understand the behavior on a given platform. no reason to treat it like a black magic :) –  Santhosh Jun 6 '12 at 14:46
    
@Santhosh I have compiled the code by myself now and thus edited the answer. –  glglgl Jun 6 '12 at 15:11
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"Undefined behaviour" means that the compiler maintainers do not have to bother with this case. I.e., what the compiler does in this case is completely meaningless. There is nothing there to "understand" except that you shouldn't invoke undefined behaviour, ever.

If you want anyone to spend his time on your question, create an example that is well-defined.

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How are you checking the optimization in the given code.
return arr would return the base address of the array. When this address goes to main, the memory pointed by arr gets destroyed. After this anything can happen, you may get segfault, your program may crash. Anything which happens on using an uninitialized pointer can happen. This code is in no way checking optimization. It may help you to understand an undefined behavior which you already know as written in your post!!!!

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