Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Strings in Delphi locating in dynamic memory.

How to calculate actual memory (in bytes) used by string variable?

I know the string must store some additional information, at least reference count and length, but how many bytes it uses except characters?

var
  S: string;

Delphi 2010, XE, XE2 used

share|improve this question
2  
The answer is documented in the official documentation: docwiki.embarcadero.com/RADStudio/en/Unicode_in_RAD_Studio –  David Heffernan Jun 6 '12 at 9:04
    
@David - The docs will lead to a wrong conclusion in 64 bits, see my comment to opc0de's answer. –  Sertac Akyuz Jun 6 '12 at 9:20
    
@Sertac I have no computer right now. Is the difference between 32 and 64 bit simply an extra 4 bytes of padding? So the length is still a 32 bit field? –  David Heffernan Jun 6 '12 at 9:39
    
@David - Yes, there's a _Padding: LongInt; field in a CPUX64 define. Length is still Longint. –  Sertac Akyuz Jun 6 '12 at 9:43
1  
@sertac Thanks. It would be great if you could write an answer that was accurate to compete with the misinformation that we presently have. –  David Heffernan Jun 6 '12 at 9:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

The layout on 32 bit UNICODE DELPHI taken from official Embarcadero documentation is like this:

UNICODE DELPHI

Note that there's an additional longint field in the 64 bit version for 16 byte alignment. The StrRec record in 'system.pas' looks like this:

StrRec = packed record
{$IF defined(CPUX64)}
  _Padding: LongInt; // Make 16 byte align for payload..
{$IFEND}
  codePage: Word;
  elemSize: Word;
  refCnt: Longint;
  length: Longint;
end;

The payload is always 2*(Length+1) in size. The overhead is 12 or 16 bytes, for 32 or 64 bit targets. Note that the actual memory block may be larger than needed as determined by the memory manager.

Finally, there has been much mis-information in this question. On 64 bit targets, strings are still indexed by 32 bit signed integers.

share|improve this answer
    
There was some weirdness, either the RefCount or the Length was limited to 32 bits and there was 32 bit reserved data. (Can't find the reference right now). –  Toon Krijthe Jun 6 '12 at 8:47
1  
The actual memory usage is larger as FastMM rounds the string size up (to 16, IIRC) for faster string resizing (s := s + 'a'). –  gabr Jun 6 '12 at 8:50
    
This applies to pre-Unicode Delphi. It is not true in Unicode Delphi. –  David Heffernan Jun 6 '12 at 8:55
1  
@DavidHeffernan help me improve the answer. Don't know what is different in unicode –  opc0de Jun 6 '12 at 8:56
1  
Read the doc link in my comment to the Q? –  David Heffernan Jun 6 '12 at 9:07

For String specifically, you can use SysUtils.ByteLength() to get the byte length of the character data, and if not zero then increment the result by SizeOf(System.StrRec) (which is the header in front of the character data) and SizeOf(Char) (for the null-terminator that is not included in the length), eg:

var 
  S: string;
  len: Integer;
begin
  S := ...;
  len := ByteLength(s);
  if len > 0 then Inc(len, SizeOf(StrRec) + SizeOf(Char));
end;

On the other hand, if you want to calculate the byte size of other string types, like AnsiString, AnsiString(N) (such as UTF8String), RawByteString, etc, you need to use System.StringElementSize() instead, eg:

var 
  S: SomeStringType;
  len: Integer;
begin
  S := ...;
  len := Length(S) * StringElementSize(S);
  if len > 0 then Inc(len, SizeOf(StrRec) + StringElementSize(s));
end;

In either case, the reason you only increment the length if the string has characters in it is because empty strings do not take up any memory at all, they are nil pointers.

share|improve this answer
    
@Remy-Where is StrRec declared in Delphi XE? StrRec is unknown is I just use 'System.StrRec' –  Altar Feb 14 at 22:34
1  
StrRec is declared in the implementation section of the System unit, so it is not directly accessible. You would have to redeclare it in your own code if you want to use it. –  Remy Lebeau Feb 14 at 22:59

To answer the question:

How to calculate actual memory (in bytes) used by string variable?

MemSize = Overhead + CharSize * (Length + 1)

CharSize = 1    // for Ansi strings
CharSize = 2    // for Unicode strings
Overhead = 8    // for 32 bit strings
Overhead = 16   // for 64 bit strings
share|improve this answer
    
16 bytes overhead for a string in 64 bit? That's quite a lot :-O Unicode already doubled the string sizes and now for short strings this gets even worse...why do 64 bit strings have more overhead? No need for 64 bit reference counts and lengths... –  jpfollenius Jun 6 '12 at 9:01
    
@Smasher - However that's correct. In 64 bits there's an additional LongInt to align to 16bytes. –  Sertac Akyuz Jun 6 '12 at 9:14
    
This answer is wrong. See the docs. –  David Heffernan Jun 6 '12 at 9:36
2  
No, length is always a 32 bit field. This answer is wrong and your comments contain mis-information. –  David Heffernan Jun 6 '12 at 9:58
1  
David is right. Length is still a 32 bit signed integer. For something that is supposed to contain text, that is big enough. And Overhead is 12 byte (not 8 byte) for strings in the latest 32 bit versions, just as David explained. –  Rudy Velthuis Jun 6 '12 at 12:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.