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I have the following table structure:

uid     | ... | created | ...
int(10) | ... | int(10) | ...

created field is filled with timestamps; here are the results of query SELECT created FROM mytable WHERE 1 LIMIT 5:

created
----------
1308122243
1308122243
1308552690
1309247417
1309254571

But when I execute SELECT DATE(created) FROM mytable WHERE 1 LIMIT 5, I get strange NULL's:

DATE(created)
-------------
2013-08-12
2013-08-12
NULL
NULL
NULL

Why that happens?

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ur resultset for the query "SELECT created FROM mytable WHERE 1 LIMIT 5" is a bit confusing, plz paste the exact resultset –  Sashi Kant Jun 6 '12 at 9:10

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You're probably looking for

SELECT DATE(FROM_UNIXTIME(created)) FROM mytable WHERE 1 LIMIT 5
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Yes, that was the case. I've found this out two minutes ago. But your answer will be accepted, of course :-) –  madfriend Jun 6 '12 at 9:11

This is happening because you fundamentally misunderstand MySQL's date and time handling. Why are you storing dates as int(10) and not DATE or TIMESTAMP? That's just wrong.

Read the documentation. http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/date-and-time-functions.html#function_date

To summarize, the int is converted to a string, and the string is interpreted as a date representation. 1308122243 is interpreted as 13-08-12 plus some extra characters and so is converted to August 12, 2013. However 1308552690 is Aug 55, 2013, and thus invalid and thus null.

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1  
Storing timestamps in a DB is a very common practice. OP did just forget to make the conversion back to date. –  dystroy Jun 6 '12 at 9:21
    
@dystroy, nothing wrong with storing timestamps in the DB, just saying that they should be stored as TIMESTAMP rather than int(10). If you need fractional second accuracy that's another story, but here the OP isn't even using hours. –  Old Pro Jun 6 '12 at 9:32
    
Also when reading other databases that you have no control over, it really helps to be able to convert the data. –  Gauthier Mar 5 at 16:03

I think you want

SELECT FROM_UNIXTIME(created) FROM mytable
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I found my own mistake, and solution was simple.

If you want to have an int(10) field be interpreted correctly as a timestamp, you should do DATE(FROM_UNIXTIME(created)) instead of just DATE(created).

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did you try FROM_UNIXTIME?

SELECT DATE( FROM_UNIXTIME(`created`)) FROM mytable WHERE 1 LIMIT 5
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