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In a Chrome plugin, through the background script, I inject a style this way:

if(!styleLeft){
    var styleLeft = document.createElement("style");
    document.head.appendChild(styleLeft);
    styleLeft.innerHTML = "a, .left-hand { cursor: wait; }";
}

but the if doesn't work when a style tag is already in the page. How can I look for my specific style?

Thanks.

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Which one is "your specific style"? –  Bergi Jun 6 '12 at 9:37
    
And why do you use styleLeft in the if-condition, you assign to it afterwards? Please show us you whole code. –  Bergi Jun 6 '12 at 9:39
    
because is for a chrome plugin –  lorussian Jun 6 '12 at 9:42
    
@Bergi my specific style is "styleLeft" –  lorussian Jun 6 '12 at 9:44
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Check for the ID. Example:

if ( !!document.getElementById( 'a-long-id-that-will-never-collide' ) ) {
    var styleLeft = document.createElement("style");

    // Set the ID so that you can check for it later
    styleLeft.id = 'a-long-id-that-will-never-collide';

    document.head.appendChild(styleLeft);
    styleLeft.innerHTML = "a, .left-hand { cursor: wait; }";
}
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Why do all this unnecessary work? Extra lookup by ID every time, setting ID than CAN collide? Solution from question itself with a single JS-side variable is almost perfect save for incorrect scope. –  Oleg V. Volkov Jun 6 '12 at 11:05
    
Because it's simple and it works without polluting the global scope. Introducing the scope matter just makes it more complicated, so I chose to answer this way. If you want to show how to play with closures, please show the code in your answer, I'll be glad to upvote it. –  Florian Margaine Jun 6 '12 at 12:13
    
It polutes DOM instead, going against very good practice to separate data and presentation layers. –  Oleg V. Volkov Jun 6 '12 at 12:40
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You could parse document.styleSheets (they should be accessible in a Chrome plugin, but I am not 100% sure). If you give every style you inject a unique title, you will have an easier way finding the styles you have already injected:

var styleLeft = document.createElement("style");
styleLeft.setAttribute("title", "<a unique id>");
document.head.appendChild(styleLeft);
styleLeft.innerHTML = "a, .left-hand { cursor: wait; }";
document.head.appendChild(styleLeft);

Now the last entry of document.styleSheets has a .title attribute. Which you can use to see if it's one of yours.

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Make sure you declare styleLeft either in global scope or in any outer scope for this check. Otherwise you just throw it away at end of scope and will be creating a new, empty variable on each iteration.

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