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I am using DataContractSerializer. I have enum in old version as below

[DataContract]
public Enum Foo
{
    [EnumMemberAttribute]
    X,

    [EnumMemberAttribute]
    Y,

    [EnumMemberAttribute]
    Z
}

I have few files where 'Z' is used. Now in latest version I removed 'Z' from enum. But when I try to use thses old files on current code, I get an exception for 'Z'.

For XmlSerializer we can avoid this issue by using XmlAttributeOverrides. But for DataContractSerializer don't know how to handle this situation.

Please help me to sort out.

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1 Answer 1

The clue is in the phrase "data contract". You can't randomly break a contract. If you do that it won't work. Now, there is some flexibility... you can usually make additions to the contract, as long as you aren't concerned about people who only know about the old contract (so even that is dubious). However, perhaps a better option is:

[EnumMemberAttribute, Obsolete("Use Y instead", true)]
Z

This will still work with DataContractSerializer (although IIRC XmlSerializer doesn't like it), but the compiler will stop you using it in regular code.

If you get rid of Z completely, you can no longer process any saved data that mentions Z.

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+1. I fail to see how the OP has a problem outside the "breaking promises" and "bad planning". Sadly there is no real solution here - beause unless Z has no meaning whatsoever.... then what is the value that should be used? Semantical change = incompatible. –  TomTom Jun 6 '12 at 9:53
    
Actualy Z don't have meaning but other data in the file is still useful.So kind of backward compabilty. –  user1427678 Jun 6 '12 at 10:31
    
@user1427678 yes, I understand the intent to retain backwards compatibility. That means not breaking your contract to pieces. The [Obsolete] mechanism is a good way to do that. Removing the enum value: not so much. –  Marc Gravell Jun 6 '12 at 10:36
1  
Yes Marc, your suggestion is good. I will take care for further modifications. But in my current case 'Z' is already removed and I can't modify the file containing foo enum. I want to somehow open previous file.Something like XmlAttributeOverrides. –  user1427678 Jun 6 '12 at 11:01

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