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I need a timezone display values as follows :

(UTC + 05:30) Chennai, Kolkata, Mumbai, New Delhi

But by using following method I am getting bit different output. How should I get the timezone display name as above ? (if required, I can use JODA).

public class TimeZoneUtil {

    private static final String TIMEZONE_ID_PREFIXES =
            "^(Africa|America|Asia|Atlantic|Australia|Europe|Indian|Pacific)/.*";
    private static List<TimeZone> timeZones;

    public static List<TimeZone> getTimeZones() {
        if (timeZones == null) {
            timeZones = new ArrayList<TimeZone>();
            final String[] timeZoneIds = TimeZone.getAvailableIDs();
            for (final String id : timeZoneIds) {
                if (id.matches(TIMEZONE_ID_PREFIXES)) {
                    timeZones.add(TimeZone.getTimeZone(id));
                }
            }

            Collections.sort(timeZones, new Comparator<TimeZone>() {

                public int compare(final TimeZone t1, final TimeZone t2) {
                    return t1.getID().compareTo(t2.getID());
                }
            });
        }

        return timeZones;
    }

    public static String getName(TimeZone timeZone) {
        return timeZone.getID().replaceAll("_", " ") + " - " + timeZone.getDisplayName();
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        timeZones = getTimeZones();
        for (TimeZone timeZone : timeZones) {
            System.out.println(getName(timeZone));
        }
    }
}
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I'm not entirely clear on how you want the desired output to be constructed. Do you want the UTC offset followed by a single city? Or followed by all the cities in that timezone? –  Mansoor Siddiqui Jun 7 '12 at 5:22
    
UTC offset followed by one city or the timezone will do... –  Nirmal Jun 7 '12 at 11:49
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1 Answer 1

This code may do the trick for you:

public static void main(String[] args) {

    for (String timeZoneId: TimeZone.getAvailableIDs()) {
        TimeZone timeZone = TimeZone.getTimeZone(timeZoneId);

        // Filter out timezone IDs such as "GMT+3"; more thorough filtering is required though
        if (!timeZoneId.matches(".*/.*")) {
            continue;
        }

        String region = timeZoneId.replaceAll(".*/", "").replaceAll("_", " ");
        int hours = Math.abs(timeZone.getRawOffset()) / 3600000;
        int minutes = Math.abs(timeZone.getRawOffset() / 60000) % 60;
        String sign = timeZone.getRawOffset() >= 0 ? "+" : "-";

        String timeZonePretty = String.format("(UTC %s %02d:%02d) %s", sign, hours, minutes, region);
        System.out.println(timeZonePretty);
    }
}

The output looks like this:

(UTC + 09:00) Tokyo

There are, however, a few caveats:

  • I only filter out timezones whose ID matches the format "continent/region" (e.g. "America/New_York"). You would have to do a more thorough filtering process to get rid of outputs such as (UTC - 08:00) GMT+8 though.

  • You should read the documentation for TimeZone.getRawOffSet() and understand what it's doing. For example, it doesn't DST effects into consideration.

  • On the whole, you should know that this is a messy approach, primarily because the timezone ID can be of so many different formats. Maybe you could restrict yourself down to the timezones that matter for your application, and just have a key value mapping of timezone IDs to display names?

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