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I have a class A with an instance variable of type X.

@interface A : NSObject {
    X *x;
}
@end

Some of the X instances additionally conform to a protocol P. I want to implement a specialized version of A specifically for those X instances.

@interface B : A {
    X <P> *x;
}
@end

This compiles fine. However, when I access x from a B instance, the change is not propagated to A. Therefore, functions of A that are not redefined use an other X instance than the functions of B.

  • Is it somehow possible to redefine an instance variable when only a protocol is added? There is a similar question about subclasses. However, a subclass and a protocol is not the same. While my approach compiles fine, it just doesn't work as intended.

  • If it is not possible: Is there a common pattern to perform this?

    1. If I do not override the instance variable with the new type, the code is cluttered with ugly stuff:

      [((X <P> *)x) methodOfP]
      
    2. If I override the instance variable, I have to propagate the changes myself to the superclass A. This needs additional functions.

    3. Using a property instead of an instance variable: Will this even work out? Can a property be redefined in a subclass?

      @interface A : NSObject {
          X *x;
      }
      @property (strong, nonatomic) X *x;
      @end
      @implementation A
      - (X *)x
      {
          return x;
      }
      - (void)setX:(X *)anX
      {
          x = anX;
      }
      @end
      
      @interface B : A
      @property (strong, nonatomic) X <P> *x;
      @end
      @implementation B
      @end
      
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2 Answers 2

What you're attempting to do violates a fundamental tenet of object-oriented programming, the Liskov Substitution Principle. An instance of B can be passed to any code expecting an A and that code is entitled to treat it as an A. That means it's allowed to invoke -setX: on the object, passing in an instance of X without any requirement that that object conforms to protocol P.

In other words, you're trying to create a subclass of A which is not an A.

The fact that you want to do this suggests a design confusion. You should step back and rethink. First, design all classes solely in terms of their interface and make sure their interfaces make sense in terms of inheritance. Only then consider implementation.

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Yep, but the subclass implementation of - setX: may not be the same than in the base class and may treat it entirely differently. –  Etan Jun 7 '12 at 12:58
    
Also, in my case, only the -x method is publically exposed as the property is readonly in the public header. –  Etan Jun 7 '12 at 12:59
    
A subclass implementation of -setX: that "treat[s] it entirely differently" is precisely the violation of the LSP that I was pointing out. And your code snippets above do not make the property read-only. It doesn't make much difference. It doesn't make sense for a subclass to have narrower constraints than its superclass. A subclass is supposed to be a supertype, with a broader range of possible operations. Perhaps you should explain what the real classes and protocol are supposed to be and why you want to do this. I suspect you're misusing the notion of a protocol. –  Ken Thomases Jun 7 '12 at 13:14

The simplest solution would be to hide the instance variables. You can do this by moving the ivars from the interface to a class continuation within the implementation file:

@interface A ()
{
    X *x;
}
@end

or to the head of the implementation:

@implementation A 
{
    X *x;
}
//methods go here
@end

You shouldn't access a superclasses ivar of directly. Instead use super.propertyName. You can then add an method to your subclass that returns x only if it implements the protocol:

-(X*<protocol>)xThatImplementProtocol
{
     X *x = super.x;

    return ([x conformsToProtocol:protocol]) ? x : nil;
}

However, this method would breaks polymorphism.

To be honest, I think you'd be using a different approach, may composition, to solve this problem. Subclassing doesn't seem like a natural fit.

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