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My code is here. There are three position:zero(0,0),end(200,200),random(0,200).

A div is in the position random(0,200) at the beginning.

I want to :

step 1) set the div in the position zero(0,0). this step no animation

step 2) move it from position zero to position end by transition. this step has animation

Code like this does't work very well:

document.getElementById('x').className = 'pos_zero';    // set the div to the position zero(0,0)
move(); 
// in function move: 
// document.getElementById('x').className = ' trans'; 
// document.getElementById('x').className += ' pos_end' ;

It seems that transition starts too early, while css style(className = 'pos_zero') hasn't applied completely yet. It just directly moves from position random to position end. And what I really want is the animation to position end from position zero, not from random.

Code like this works:

document.getElementById('x').className = 'pos_zero';    // set the div to the position zero(0,0)    
setTimeout('move()',1);

This code do successfully by using a timeout function. This code sets the div in the position pos_zero first and then do transition asynchronously by a timeout function. And the timeout function seems not very professional.

So, I'm looking for a more professional solution.

By the way. I wonder. If there is any way to ensure the style is applied completely, like "Style.flush()" or something?

@Inerdial It does work!Many thanks.To force an update (to force an immediate, synchronous reflow or relayout), your javascript should read a property that's affected by the change, e.g. the location of someSpan and otherSpan.` The new code works without Timeout.

document.getElementById('x').className = 'pos_zero';
var tmp = document.getElementById('x').offsetTop; // read a property to force an update.
move(); 

Thank you guys all. And sorry for the confusing made by me.

share|improve this question
    
Using setTimeout(move) does what you want. Just use that. I don't understand what's the problem with this being "asynchronous", seeing as the setTimeout call is the last one in its function and you don't need its return value. –  millimoose Jun 6 '12 at 12:12
1  
It's confusing to create your own $ function in the day and age of standardized JS frameworks. –  mVChr Jun 6 '12 at 12:23
    
To Inerdial:You're right. But I think this "asynchronous" way seems odd, and makes me uncomfortable. And the setTimeout is not very convenient to use especially in a situation like being in an anonymous class or a prototype function. So I'm not into it very much, and looking for a better way. –  hardPass Jun 6 '12 at 12:34
    
TO mVChr: That's true. the $ here just returns document.getElementById(id). You can see the whole code in http://jsfiddle.net/VeJxD/. As a new JavaScript coder, I'm not very into any JS frameworks like jQuery. No offense. Maybe I'm just not used to it. Perhaps I would change my mind soon. –  hardPass Jun 6 '12 at 12:44
1  
I don't really understand what's wrong with the animation. It seems to me it's working as expected. But if you need subtle perfection you should use setInterval. The difference between setInterval and setTimeout is that the first will execute the update asynchronously and will fire the next sequence after the first one has finished, but the last one will execute the code at the given timestamp which means it should happen the browser will fire the next update before the previous iteration hasn't finished yet. –  Simo Endre Jun 6 '12 at 13:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Thanks to @Inerdial. It does work!. Actually this answer is coming from his comment.

To force an update (to force an immediate, synchronous reflow or relayout), your javascript should read a property that's affected by the change, e.g. the location of someSpan and otherSpan.` - stackoverflow.com/a/1397505/41655

The new code works without Timeout(jsfiddle.net/vd6V8):

document.getElementById('x').className = 'pos_zero';
var tmp = document.getElementById('x').offsetTop; // read a property to force an update.
move(); 

Thank you guys all. And sorry for the confusing made by me.

share|improve this answer

This is actually the only way, because between CSS changes the browser needs to "disengage" from the currently running code.

When you use setTimeout() the code exits, CSS gets applied and then your other code gets run. This yields the expected behaviour.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually I'm afraid this is not the only way to do that. Try this:stackoverflow.com/a/1397505/41655. I just got it from a comment. –  hardPass Jun 7 '12 at 2:23
    
@hardPass Mozilla ain't Webkit ;-) but do let me know if you managed to solve it differently, I'll be interested to know. –  Ja͢ck Jun 7 '12 at 2:43
    
I have already tried it in chrome. –  hardPass Jun 7 '12 at 3:24
    
Try this:jsfiddle.net/vd6V8 –  hardPass Jun 7 '12 at 3:30
    
@hardPass nifty! feel free to answer your own question :) –  Ja͢ck Jun 7 '12 at 3:32

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