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The following example runs successfully (i.e. doesn't hang) if compiled using Clang 3.2 or GCC 4.7 on Ubuntu 12.04, but hangs if I compile using VS11 Beta or VS2012 RC.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <thread>
#include "boost/thread/thread.hpp"

void SleepFor(int ms) {
  std::this_thread::sleep_for(std::chrono::milliseconds(ms));
}

template<typename T>
class ThreadTest {
 public:
  ThreadTest() : thread_([] { SleepFor(10); }) {}
  ~ThreadTest() {
    std::cout << "About to join\t" << id() << '\n';
    thread_.join();
    std::cout << "Joined\t\t" << id() << '\n';
  }
 private:
  std::string id() const { return typeid(decltype(thread_)).name(); }
  T thread_;
};

int main() {
  static ThreadTest<std::thread> std_test;
  static ThreadTest<boost::thread> boost_test;
//  SleepFor(100);
}

The issue appears to be that std::thread::join() never returns if it is invoked after main has exited. It is blocked at WaitForSingleObject in _Thrd_join defined in cthread.c.

Uncommenting SleepFor(100); at the end of main allows the program to exit properly, as does making std_test non-static. Using boost::thread also avoids the issue.

So I'd like to know if I'm invoking undefined behaviour here (seems unlikely to me), or if I should be filing a bug against VS2012?

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Beta and Release Candidate issues? –  Jaywalker Jun 6 '12 at 13:34
    
@Jaywalker Well I guess that's what I'm asking. Is it reasonable to expect join() to not hang if it's invoked after main has exited. If so, this is a bug which I'd like to get into MS Connect sooner rather than later. –  Fraser Jun 6 '12 at 13:42
    
Could you try to test if the std::thread::joinable() still returns true before the hanging ? –  Plexico Jun 6 '12 at 15:03
    
Please file a bug on Microsoft Connect (I don't know if this is actually a bug; I'm not that familiar with the std::thread specification. But it would be worth reporting nonetheless.) –  James McNellis Jun 6 '12 at 16:48
    
@JamesMcNellis OK - done thanks. connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/feedback/details/747145 –  Fraser Jun 6 '12 at 20:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Tracing through Fraser's sample code in his connect bug (https://connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/feedback/details/747145) with VS2012 RTM seems to show a fairly straightforward case of deadlocking. This likely isn't specific to std::thread - likely _beginthreadex suffers the same fate.

What I see in the debugger is the following:

On the main thread, the main() function has completed, the process cleanup code has acquired a critical section called _EXIT_LOCK1, called the destructor of ThreadTest, and is waiting (indefinitely) on the second thread to exit (via the call to join()).

The second thread's anonymous function completed and is in the thread cleanup code waiting to acquire the _EXIT_LOCK1 critical section. Unfortunately, due to the timing of things (whereby the second thread's anonymous function's lifetime exceeds that of the main() function) the main thread already owns that critical section.

DEADLOCK.

Anything that extends the lifetime of main() such that the second thread can acquire _EXIT_LOCK1 before the main thread avoids the deadlock situation. That's why the uncommenting the sleep in main() results in a clean shutdown.

Alternatively if you remove the static keyword from the ThreadTest local variable, the destructor call is moved up to the end of the main() function (instead of in the process cleanup code) which then blocks until the second thread has exited - avoiding the deadlock situation.

Or you could add a function to ThreadTest that calls join() and call that function at the end of main() - again avoiding the deadlock situation.

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Nice analysis.~ –  Michael Burr Nov 22 '12 at 9:56
    
@CWoods - can you stick the link to my MS Connect bug report into your answer? I'd like to mark yours as correct and delete mine. –  Fraser Nov 22 '12 at 12:31
    
@Frazer - Done! Glad to have helped! –  CWoods Nov 26 '12 at 3:19

I believe your threads have already been terminated and their resources freed following the termination of your main function and before static destruction. This is the behavior of the VC runtimes dating back to at least VC6.

Does child threads exit when the parent thread terminates

boost thread and process cleanup on windows

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This answer is specific to windows, but I assumed since you are using VS. –  TractorPulledPork Jun 6 '12 at 13:39
    
I am using Windows, but I'm not sure your answer is right unfortunately. The main thread is the one which is executing join, so even though the function main has exited, the main thread has not terminated. Thanks anyway. –  Fraser Jun 6 '12 at 13:47
    
More relevant content: stackoverflow.com/questions/8001989/… –  TractorPulledPork Jun 6 '12 at 13:58
    
Perhaps the code that kills the threads is somewhere in the runtime on the outside of the main call but I can assure you your threads are gone by the time your destructors are called. –  TractorPulledPork Jun 6 '12 at 14:03
    
I've updated my answer to be more specific. –  TractorPulledPork Jun 6 '12 at 14:13

I have been battling this bug for a day, and found the following work-around, which turned out the be the least dirty trick:

Instead of returning, one can use the standard Windows API function call ExitThread() to terminate the thread. This method of course may mess up the internal state of the std::thread object and associated library, but since the program is going to terminate anyway, well, so be it.

#include <windows.h>

template<typename T>
class ThreadTest {
 public:
  ThreadTest() : thread_([] { SleepFor(10); ExitThread(NULL); }) {}
  ~ThreadTest() {
    std::cout << "About to join\t" << id() << '\n';
    thread_.join();
    std::cout << "Joined\t\t" << id() << '\n';
  }
 private:
  std::string id() const { return typeid(decltype(thread_)).name(); }
  T thread_;
};

The join() call apparently works correctly. However, I chose to use a more safe method in our solution. One can get the thread HANDLE via std::thread::native_handle(). With this handle we can call the Windows API directly to join the thread:

WaitForSingleObject(thread_.native_handle(), INFINITE);
CloseHandle(thread_.native_handle());

Thereafter, the std::thread object must not be destroyed, as the destructor would try to join the thread a second time. So we just leave the std::thread object dangling at program exit.

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