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Folks

I came across many threads for understanding polymorphism (Both compile time and run time). I was surprised to see some links where the programmers are claiming Overloading is Runtime and Overriding is compile time.

What I want to know from here is:

  1. Runtime Polymorphism with a REAL TIME example and small code and what scenario we should use.
  2. Compile time Polymorphism with REAL TIME example and small code and when to use.

Because I read many theoretical definitions, but I am not satisfied in understanding that.

Also, I gave a thought, that where I also felt, overloading should be runtime as because, say I have a method that calculates Area, at runtime only it decides which overloaded method to call based on parameters I pass (Say if I pass only one parameter, it should fire Square, and if parameters are 2, it should fire Rectangle)....So isn't it I can claim its runtime ? How its complie time ? (Most say theoretically, overloading is compile time but they dont even give a correct REAL time example...very few claim its runtime)....

Also, I feel overriding is compile time because, while you write code and complie, you ensure you used virtual keyword and also overriding that method in derived class which otherwise would give you compile time error. So I feel its compile time, the same way where I saw in a thread.....But most threads claims its runtime :D

I am confused :( This question is additional to my question 1 and 2. Please help with a real time example.. as I am already aware of theoretical definitions .... :(

Thank you....

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If I understand your question at all: run time, calling virtual methods. compile time, calling any other method. –  Jeff Mercado Jun 6 '12 at 14:07
    
UhmmM Jeff but is it all it is about ? –  Divine Jun 6 '12 at 14:10
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In the case of Overloading, you are using static (compile-time) polymorphism because the compiler is aware of exactly which method you are calling. For example:

public static class test
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Foo();
        Foo("test");
    }

    public static void Foo()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("No message supplied");
    }

    public static void Foo(string message)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(message);
    }
}

In this case, the compiler knows exactly which Foo() method we are calling, based on the number/type of parameters.

Overriding is an example of dynamic (runtime) polymorphism). This is due to the fact that the compiler doesn't necessarily know what type of object is being passed in at compile-time. Suppose you have the following classes in a library:

public static class MessagePrinter
{
    public static void PrintMessage(IMessage message)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(message.GetMessage());
    }
}

public interface IMessage
{
    public string GetMessage();
}

public class XMLMessage : IMessage
{
    public string GetMessage()
    {
        return "This is an XML Message";
    }
}

public class SOAPMessage : IMessage
{
    public string GetMessage()
    {
        return "This is a SOAP Message";
    }
}

At compile time, you don't know if the caller of that function is passing in an XMLMessage, a SOAPMessage, or possibly another type of IMessage defined elsewhere. When the PrintMessage() function is call, it determines which version of GetMessage() to use at runtime, based on the type of IMessage that is passed in.

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1  
Jon, I should work with people like you around for two things. 1. Learning stuffs for real time and satisfactorily and for passion rather than coding for the sake of completing task and getting paid. 2. Your attitude in sharing your knowledge and most significantly in a way that can reach the mind of people who ask question... Unlike MSDN... :(... Well thanks a lot Jon, your example made me understand it to a greater extent of the concept.... Happy :) Cheers –  Divine Jun 6 '12 at 14:30
    
just to getrid off from the problem of 'Foo': cannot declare instance members in a static class,your method must be static. –  Rahul Nov 20 '13 at 6:53
    
It took me a minute to understand what you meant, but I see that you are referring to your edit. Thanks for pointing out that I was declaring instance members in a static class in the first example. I hastily threw that example together and didn't notice. –  Jon Senchyna Nov 20 '13 at 13:30
    
In the case of Overloading, the compiler is aware of exactly which method you are calling. True, unless you're using dynamic keyword. in which case overload resolution is done during run time. –  nawfal Feb 3 at 18:21
    
If you're using the dynamic keyword, it doesn't matter whether you overloaded your method or not; the entire method resolution itself is done during run time. –  Jon Senchyna Feb 5 at 12:57
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Read : Polymorphism (C# Programming Guide)

Similar answer : Compile Time and run time Polymorphism

Well, there are two types of Polymorphism as stated below:

  • Static Polymorphism (Early binding)
  • Dynamic Polymorphism (Late binding)

Static Polymorphism(Early Binding):

Static Polymorphism is also know as Early Binding and Compile time Polymorphism. Method Overloading and Operator Overloading are examples of the same.

It is known as Early Binding because the compiler is aware of the functions with same name and also which overloaded function is tobe called is known at compile time.

For exa:

public class Test()

{

    public Test()

   {

   }

  public int add(int no1, int no2)

     {

     }

public int add(int no1, int no2, int no3)

     {

     }

}

class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Test tst = new Test ();
             int sum = an.add(10,20);           

       // here in above statement compiler is aware at compile time that need to call function add(int no1, int no2), hence it is called early binding and it is fixed so called static binding.
        }
    }

Dynamic Polymorphism(Late Binding):

   public class Animal
        {
            public virtual void MakeSound()
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Animal sound");
            }
        }
        public class Dog:Animal
        {
            public override void MakeSound()
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Dog sound");
            }

        }

        class Program
        {
            static void Main(string[] args)
            {
                Animal an = new Dog();
                an.MakeSound();           
                Console.ReadLine();
            }
        }

As in the above code , as any other call to a virtual method, will be compiled to a callvirt IL instruction. This means that the actual method that gets called is determined at run-time (unless the JIT can optimize some special case), but the compiler checked that the method exists, it chose the most appropriate overload (if any) and it has the guarantee that the function pointer will exist at a well-defined location in the vtable of the type (even though that is an implementation detail). The process of resolving the virtual call is extremely fast (you only need to dereference a few pointers), so it doesn't make much of a difference.

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Pranay thank you. But why only when I input value at runtime, say only 2 parameters in your case, it decides to call the method with 2 parameters ? It just compiles at compile time...how you can call it as a Compile time :( Its runtime because at runtime only based on inputs, it fires the appropriate function .... –  Divine Jun 6 '12 at 14:15
    
@Divine - its comipler time becuase compiler knows that its has to call which method for example if the 2 parameter are there compiler easily detect that its has to call 2 parameter method only...if 3 than call gose to 3 parameter... –  Pranay Rana Jun 6 '12 at 14:24
    
@Divine- compiler knows about the signature of methods of the class and that can easily be resolved out... –  Pranay Rana Jun 6 '12 at 14:25
    
thanks pranay...... –  Divine Jun 6 '12 at 14:43
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