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Is there a way to use a variable name which has a function assigned to it, for example, to get the actual width of an element?

var xvar = function(){ return $('#y').width()}

And use it as

console.log(xvar);

Instead of

console.log(xvar());

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1  
You can't call a function without calling a function, in general, though you might want to look at using property getter functions (in newer JavaScript interpreters only). edit see @pimvdb's answer :-) – Pointy Jun 6 '12 at 14:11
up vote 12 down vote accepted

Not with variables, but it is possible with properties on objects. It's called a getter.

var obj = {
  get xvar() { return $('#y').width(); }
};

Then you can use:

obj.xvar;  // will run the above function

(Theoretically, a way to use a variable getter is when an object's properties reflect the variables. For example, the window object.)

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1  
+1. If I'm not wrong, it's not fully cross browser supported. – gdoron Jun 6 '12 at 14:13
1  
Is that ES5/6? I've never heard of this. It's awesome though. – Florian Margaine Jun 6 '12 at 14:14
    
@FlorianMargaine. goggle javascript getter. – gdoron Jun 6 '12 at 14:14
    
@gdororn: Very true, good point. @ Florian Magazine: ES5 specs are here. – pimvdb Jun 6 '12 at 14:15
1  
@FlorianMargaine. You should learn how to google things about javascript. you add an MDN prefix... Example – gdoron Jun 6 '12 at 14:17

As long as your function returns String or Number this could be an alternative for non-ES5 environments:

var xvar = new function(id){ 
              this.toString = 
              this.valueOf = function(){
                   return $(id).width()};
           }('#y');
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Niiice, thanks mate! – MollyRazor Jun 7 '12 at 11:05

If I not mistake it will work because xvar will store reference to result of immediately-invoked function:

var xvar = (function() { return $('#y').width(); })();
console.log(xvar);

But after it you can't use xvar() version.

share|improve this answer
1  
This is basically equivalent to var xvar = $('#y').width();. It won't run the function on access. – pimvdb Jun 6 '12 at 14:21
    
Yeah, that just assigns the return value in the first place. You wouldn't get an updated version of width with that. – Erik Reppen Jun 6 '12 at 14:23
    
But it looks like right answer :) Sorry my fault. – Ruben Nagoga Jun 6 '12 at 14:25

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