Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to remove all the vowels from a string except for the first and last character. I have tried with 2 expressions and using 2 ways but in vain. I have described them below. Does anybody has a regular expression for this?

e.g.

original string -- source = apeaple

after regex -- source_modified = apple (this is what is expected)

I tried the expression ([a-zA-Z])[aeiouAEIOU]([a-zA-Z]) but this expression is removing repeated character as well. So the following is happening when i apply the above expression

code used --

Regex reg = new Regex("([a-zA-Z])[aeiouAEIOU]([a-zA-Z])");
string source_modified = reg.Replace(source, "");

original string -- source = apeaple

after code execution -- source_modified = aple (repeating character removed)

code used -- string source_modified = Regex.Replace(source, "([a-zA-Z])[aeiouAEIOU]([a-zA-Z])", "$1" + "$2");

original string -- source = apeaple

after code execution -- source_modified = apaple (just 1 vowel gets removed)

i also tried ([a-zA-Z])[aeiouAEIOU]*([a-zA-Z]) but this is removing just 1 vowel and not all. So the following is happening when i apply the above expression

code used --

Regex reg = new Regex("([a-zA-Z])[aeiouAEIOU]*([a-zA-Z])");
string source_modified = reg.Replace(source, "");

original string -- source = apeaple

after code execution -- source_modified = "" (all characters are removed)

code used -- string source_modified = Regex.Replace(source, "([a-zA-Z])[aeiouAEIOU]*([a-zA-Z])", "$1" + "$2");

original string -- source = apeaple

after code execution -- source_modified = apeple

Please help! Thanks in advance!

Regards,

Samar

share|improve this question
    
Wait - if you want to remove all vowels except first and last character apeaple -> apeple is wrong! it should be apeaple -> apple, no? –  ananthonline Jun 6 '12 at 14:14
    
You need to anchor begin and end. ^ $. –  Blam Jun 6 '12 at 14:15
1  
RegEx is not a guessing game lol get a gui to help you test (and learn) like radsoftware.com.au/regexdesigner –  banging Jun 6 '12 at 14:21
    
Of note is that ([a-zA-Z])[aeiouAEIOU]([a-zA-Z]) is not removing the double letter but removing the vowel and the letter before and after it (this is what you are matching and you are replacing it with nothing). This happens to remove both vowels as well as one of the Ps but it has nothign to do with the repeat. –  Chris Jun 6 '12 at 14:29
    
@Chris; Oh ok..!! I thought otherwise..!! Anyways thanks for pointing that out..!! –  samar Jun 6 '12 at 14:33
show 3 more comments

4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You need some lookaround like so

(?<!^)[aouieyAOUIEY](?!$)

C# supports it and it's very powerful

string resultString = null;
try {
    resultString = Regex.Replace(subjectString, "(?<!^)[aeui](?!$)", "");
} catch (ArgumentException ex) {
    // Syntax error in the regular expression
}

Update 1

T.W.R.Cole informs me that there is a special rule in the English language ("this doesn't work for words like "Anyanka" where an inner 'y' is used as a consonant")

The following change should do this, using the technique of negative lookahead:

(?<!^)([aouie]|y(?![aouie]))(?!$)

This time enable the regex modifier that matches case insensitive, it makes the regex simpler than the original

if a y followed by another y still means that the y is a consonant (euh... is there such a word) and thus should not disappear than a y must be listed in the last character class as well :

(?<!^)([aouie]|y(?![aouiey]))(?!$)

I repeat that I used C# as my regex dialect which has good support for lookaround techniques.

share|improve this answer
    
this is working beautifully..!! Need to check it with other combinations of vowels but i think it will work just fine..!! Thanks a million..!! :) –  samar Jun 6 '12 at 14:42
    
this doesn't work for words like "Anyanka" where an inner 'y' is used as a consonant. To find vowel 'y' you need to eliminate 'y's that are followed by a vowel. –  T.W.R.Cole Sep 10 '13 at 15:00
    
@T.W.R.Cole I was not familiar with such a rule in the English language. I Updated my answer to support it. –  buckley Sep 10 '13 at 21:07
add comment

If so, why not remove the 1st and last character, remove vowels, and then stitch up again?

string sWord = "apeaple";
char cFirst = sWord[0], cLast = sWord[sWord.length-1];

sWord = sWord.substring(1, sWord.length -2);

sWord = cFirst.ToString() + 
        Regex.Replace(sWord , "[aouiyeAOUIYE]", String.Empty) + 
        cLast.ToString();
share|improve this answer
    
This is certainly a valid solution but I do prefer buckley's one below since it is a bit neater (though does have an uglier regex). This is certainly the best though probably for the OP who seems to not be too comfortable with regex and what they do. –  Chris Jun 6 '12 at 14:30
    
@Shai; this looks like a good option. But maybe this is a workaround. Any better solution than this?? –  samar Jun 6 '12 at 14:31
    
@samar, see buckley's answer - it works and its a one liner (well almost) using regex, you should accept it. –  Shai Jun 6 '12 at 14:35
add comment

You need to start the string with at least one character, find a vowel and then end the string with at least one character. Try:

(.+)[aeiouAEIOU](.+)
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't look like it will help much... If you replace with $1$2 then in my tests it doesn't do the right thing... If you replace with nothign then of course it removes everything... –  Chris Jun 6 '12 at 14:27
    
What results are you getting? –  Eliot Ball Jun 6 '12 at 14:28
    
If I remember correctly it was just stripping one character from the middle which is about what I'd expect. Why, what results are you getting? –  Chris Jun 7 '12 at 9:28
    
If you repeatedly apply this until it doesn't match then that should work. –  Eliot Ball Jun 7 '12 at 19:25
    
ah, ok. I see your thinking now. You probably should have put in all the loop stuff since the assumption was that any regex would be just a single use as per the original question. And if you are doing it that way you are probably better off doing just . instead of .+ and putting a + on the vowels (ie (.)[aeiouAEIOU]+(.)) Yours will only ever do one substitution per run through due to the greedy matching of + and will only ever remove one vowel. My modified one will get multiple vowels and consume only one other character at a time. Obviously other answers are better though. –  Chris Jun 8 '12 at 9:08
show 1 more comment

In case you ever want to apply that to individual words in strings that consist of more than one word, \B[AEIOUaeiou]\B might be worth a try. \B is a non-word-boundary, i.e. any location where the two adjacent characters are either both word characters or both non-word characters. The latter case is obviously not possible if there's a vowel between the two locations.

Needless to say it also works for strings consisting only of a single word.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.