Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My problem domain is advertising, and, to that end, I have a database which contains a table called ADVERT. An advert can have facets (i.e. quasi-taxonomic descriptive terms). So, there's a FACET table which defines the facets and a FACETTERM table which contains the values for each facet. ADVERTFACETTERMASSIGNMENT is the link table which says which facet term values are allocated to which advert.

So, you may have an advert for a car which has a value "Honda" for it's "Make" facet, and "Sussex" for its "Location" facet. So if the advert is advert {PK = 14}, and Honda is facet-term {PK = 1} and Sussex is facet-term {PK = 2}, you expect to rows in ADVERTFACETTERMASSIGNMENT { AdvertId, FacetTermId }: 14, 1 and 14, 2.

Given this arrangement, how do I go about finding all the other adverts which are for Hondas in Sussex? In other words, how do I find a set of rows in ADVERTFACETTERMASSIGNMENT which match the rows from that table for a given advert but which are not from that advert?

I am using SQL Server 2008. I have tried using an IN clause, but this returns partial matches, i.e. all Hondas other than in Sussex and all cars in Sussex which aren't Hondas etc.

To restate my requirements, I need to find all rows from ADVERTFACETTERMASSIGNMENT where those rows contain at least the same facet-term ids as those for another given advert. It doesn't matter if it has more facet-terms, provided it has at least exactly the same facet-terms as the chosen, comparator, advert.

share|improve this question
2  
Please show schema, sample data and desired results. I feel like I'm back in high school trying to decipher a cryptic word problem from my least favorite teacher. –  Aaron Bertrand Jun 6 '12 at 14:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is basically an EAV - Entity, Attribute, Value model with fixed selections of values.

WITH FLATTENED AS (
    SELECT a.ADVERT_ID, ft.FACETTERM_ID
    FROM ADVERT a
    INNER JOIN ADVERTFACETTERMASSIGNMENT afta
        ON afto.ADVERT_ID = a.ADVERT_ID
    INNER JOIN FACETTERM ft
        ON ft.FACETTERM_ID = afta.FACETTERM_ID
    INNER JOIN FACET f
        ON f.FACET_ID = ft.FACET_ID
)
SELECT rhs.ADVERT_ID, COUNT(*)
FROM FLATTENED lhs
INNER JOIN FLATTENED rhs
    ON lhs.ADVERT_ID = @SOME_ID
    AND rhs.ADVERT_ID <> lhs.ADVERT_ID
    AND rhs.FACETTERM_ID = lhs.FACETTERM_ID
GROUP BY rhs.ADVERT_ID
HAVING COUNT(*) = (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM FLATTENED WHERE ADVERT_ID = @SOME_ID)

The technique here is that the number of matched facets in the inner join between any two adverts has to be equal to the number of facets of the object advert on the left hand side.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the general solution, but what is the point of using FLATTENED over just using ADVERTFACETTERMASSIGNMENT (AFTA)? Isn't FLATTENED just a validated copy of AFTA with the extra overhead of having to join the tables? –  Mr.Mindor Jun 6 '12 at 17:36
    
@Mr.Mindor no real reason, I just joined everything up so I wouldn't have to repeat it if I needed it (since this is a self join of the set). I figure in real life, such a view would exist already (in an EAV system). –  Cade Roux Jun 6 '12 at 18:12
    
Thank you very much indeed. This clearly works (I've tested in on my DB and have the correct results), but as a non-SQL developer, I don't understand WHY it works. Can you spell it out, please? –  Mr Moo Jun 7 '12 at 10:28
1  
@user1439973 If you go ahead and put some data into a SQLFiddle example (sqlfiddle.com) I'll show you how it works step by step. Basically, it's a self-join to reveal all the other advert matches. When grouped by other advert each other advert has a count of matches for that advert to the object advert. If the count of matches for a given advert matches the total count of the object advert, then it must be a perfect (or strict superset) match. –  Cade Roux Jun 7 '12 at 12:43

Ok where ADVERTFACETTERMASSIGNMENT is {AdvertId, FacetTermId} for a two term search...

select fta1.AdvertID 
from ADVERTFACETTERMASSIGNMENT fta1
join ADVERTFACETTERMASSIGNMENT fta2 on fta1.AdvertID = fta2.AdvertID
where fta1.FacetTermId = @searchFacet1 and fta2.FacetTermID = @searchFacet2
and fta1.AdvertID <> @searchAdvertId

a general answer with working example:

declare @AdvertFacetTermAssignment table (AdvertId int, FacetTermId int)

insert into @AdvertFacetTermAssignment values
(1,10), (1,11), (2,10), (3,11), (4,10), (4,11), (5,10), (5,11), (5,12), (6,10), (6,12), (6,13), (7, 10), (7, 11), (8, 12), (9,10), (9,11), (9,12), (10, 10), (10,12)

declare @searchAdvertId int = 1
declare @targetMatch int = (select COUNT(*) from @AdvertFacetTermAssignment where AdvertId = @searchAdvertId)

select aft2.AdvertId from @AdvertFacetTermAssignment aft1 
join @AdvertFacetTermAssignment aft2
on aft1.FacetTermId = aft2.FacetTermId and aft1.AdvertId <> aft2.AdvertId
where aft1.AdvertId = @searchAdvertId
group by aft2.AdvertId 
having COUNT(*) = @targetMatch

results = 4,5,7,9

This last one is not what was requested, but grabs everything similar (some matching facets) and orders by how similar.
(all matches are treated equally)

 select aft2.AdvertId, COUNT(aft1.AdvertId) as matches, ABS(COUNT(*)-@targetMatch) as nonMatches 
 from @AdvertFacetTermAssignment aft1
 right outer join @AdvertFacetTermAssignment aft2
 on aft2.FacetTermId = aft1.FacetTermId 
    and aft1.AdvertId = @searchAdvertId
    and aft2.AdvertId <> @searchAdvertId
 group by aft2.AdvertId 
 having COUNT(aft1.AdvertId) > 0
 order by COUNT(aft1.AdvertId) DESC, ABS(COUNT(*)-@targetMatch) ASC 

results:

 AdvertId matches nonMatches
 4        2       0
 7        2       0
 9        2       1
 5        2       1
 10       1       0
 6        1       1
 2        1       1
 3        1       1

(btw I'm posting this from Sussex, WI)

share|improve this answer

One approach could be to inner join the advertfacettermassignment table to itself, on facettermid, and group by the advertid, to count the number of matching facets between adverts.

You can then compare this to the total number of facets in the first advert, and if the number of matches is the same, then it has at least exactly the same facet terms as the chosen comparator.

In SQL SERVER 2008, you can use CTEs to make this a bit easier. Like this:

;WITH m AS
    (SELECT advertid,candidateid,COUNT(*) as matchingfacets FROM (
        SELECT a.advertid,b.advertid as candidateid FROM advertfacettermassignment a 
        INNER JOIN advertfacettermassignment b ON a.facettermid=b.facettermid) sub
    GROUP BY advertid,candidateid)
,t AS
    (SELECT advertid,COUNT(*) as TotalFacets FROM advertfacettermassignment GROUP BY advertid)
SELECT 
    totalfacets.advertid,
    matchingfacets.candidateid,
    t.totalfacets,
    m.matchingFacets
FROM m INNER JOIN t
ON m.advertid=t.advertid
WHERE matchingfacets=totalfacets
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.