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In Visual Studio, I have some Javascript code on a site I'm developing. While I'm debugging I'm using the $ajax call to "localhost". When deployed, it will need to be the actual server:

$('#textInput_UserName').focusout(function () {
    var _username = $('#textInput_UserName').val();
    $.ajax({
        url: 'http://localhost:8809/Account/UserNameExists/',
        data: { username: _username },
        dataType: 'html',
});

When I publish, I need to transform that localhost to the actual domain:

$('#textInput_UserName').focusout(function () {
    var _username = $('#textInput_UserName').val();
    $.ajax({
        url: 'http://www.mydomain.com/Account/UserNameExists/',
        data: { username: _username },
        dataType: 'html',
});

Is there an easy/automatic way to do this, similar to the way Web Config transforms work?

Many thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Can't' you inject this value into JS from configuration? –  Oded Jun 6 '12 at 15:06
    
@Oded- thanks, I'm not sure what you mean. How do you do that? –  Hairgami_Master Jun 6 '12 at 15:15
    
I think you can use post build events for your project. [link]msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/42x5kfw4%28v=vs.80%29.aspx I'd recomend to use global variable for js - like domainUrl and use it for create url in your's js files url: domainUrl + '/Account/' –  cycaHuH Jun 6 '12 at 15:54
    
Actually you can create .js file with settings for each of configurations that you use. Then just use web.config transforms to let system know which .js file it should use. –  cycaHuH Jun 6 '12 at 15:59

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You don't, you just omit the host, the browser will fill this in for you, like this:

$('#textInput_UserName').focusout(function () {
    var _username = $('#textInput_UserName').val();
    $.ajax({
        url: '/Account/UserNameExists/',
        data: { username: _username },
        dataType: 'html',
});

If you're actually talking about x-domain requests, which I doubt you are, then just set a global js site variable.

share|improve this answer
    
Ha! Are you serious? What an idiot I am! Still curious if it's possible for other scenarios, but thanks a million! –  Hairgami_Master Jun 6 '12 at 15:17
    
Yep! It's almost one of these things you forget you need to tell someone... It follows all the same rules as similar things such as img src, so you can use absolute or relative paths. –  mattmanser Jun 6 '12 at 16:23

I recommend you to use this:

url: '<%= ResolveClientUrl("~/Account/UserNameExists/")',

If you do it this way you'll avoid problems if you:

  • install the app in a virtual directory instead of the domain root
  • move your page to a different directory level in your app
  • use your service from a master page or user control, which can be instantiated in different pages, an thus directory levels

You can also expose a public property in your page/user control/master page, and use it from code in the same way, i.e:

  • code in the page/uc/master: public string ServiceUrl { get { return ResolveClientUrl("~/Account/UserNameExists/");}
  • code in .aspx: url: '<%= ServiceUrl',
share|improve this answer

Are you making a call to a web service or what is the destination of this url? When I am working with ajax calls in my web applications I usually set up the methods inside of a web service and call them like this:

 $.ajax({
        type: "POST",
        url: "../Services/BookingService.asmx/GetVerifiedReservations",
        data: paramsJson,
        contentType: "application/json; charset=utf-8",
        dataType: "json",
        async: false,
        success: function (response) {
            invalidDays = $.parseJSON(response.d);
        },
        error: function (xhr, textStatus, thrownError) {
            alert(textStatus);
            alert(thrownError);
        }
    });

As you can see the path is relative to the rest of the files in your domain.

share|improve this answer
    
That's awesome- thanks man! –  Hairgami_Master Jun 6 '12 at 20:33

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