Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Well, I am abit confuse using these \r,\n,\t etc things. Because I read online (php.net), it seems like works, but i try it, here is my simple code:

<?php
    $str   = "My name is jingle \n\r";
    $str2  = "I am a boy";

    echo $str . $str2;
?>

But the outcome is "My name is jingle I am a boy"

Either I put the \r\n in the var or in the same line as echo, the outcome is the same. Anyone knows why?

share|improve this question
    
@Jingleboy- looking at this again, it looks like your "\n\r", is a typo. If you correct this it will then become more obvious that the problem is not using <pre></pre> tags or inserting a <br />. –  RichardOD Jul 7 '09 at 11:45

6 Answers 6

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Because you are outputting to a browser, you need to use a <br /> instead, otherwise wrap your output in <pre> tags.

Try:

<?php
    $str   = "My name is jingle <br />";
    $str2  = "I am a boy";

    echo $str . $str2;
?>

Or:

<?php
    $str   = "My name is jingle \n\r";
    $str2  = "I am a boy";

    echo '<pre>' .$str . $str2 . '</pre>';
?>

Browsers will not <pre>serve non-HTML formatting unless made explicit using <pre> - they are interested only in HTML.

share|improve this answer
    
This is a good answer, but having \n\r is bad as Jon points out. –  RichardOD Jul 7 '09 at 11:31

Well in your example you've got \n\r rather than \r\n - that's rarely a good idea.

Where are you seeing this outcome? In a web browser? In the source of a page, still in a web browser? What operating system are you using? All of these make a difference.

Different operating systems use different line terminators, and HTML/XML doesn't care much about line breaking, in that the line breaks in the source just mean "whitespace" (so you'll get a space between words, but not necessarily a line break).

share|improve this answer
1  
LF is Unix-like and CR+LF is Windows. LF+CR is as Jingleboy99 has is just wrong. –  RichardOD Jul 7 '09 at 11:29
    
what is LF and CR?? –  jingleboy99 Jul 8 '09 at 2:31
    
LF = Line Feed (\n); CR = Carriage Return ('\r') –  Jon Skeet Jul 8 '09 at 5:25

You could also use nl2br():

echo nl2br($str . $str2);

What this function does is replace newline characters in your string to <br>.

Also, you don't need \r, just \n.

share|improve this answer

In HTML, spaces, tabs, linefeeds and carriage returns are all equivalent white space characters.

In text, historically the following combinations have been used for newlines

  • \r on Apple Macs
  • \r\n on Windows
  • \n on Unix
share|improve this answer

Either use \n (*NIX) or \r\n (DOS / Windows), \n\r is very uncommon. Once you fix that, it should work just fine.

Of course, if you're outputting HTML, a line break does nothing unless it's inside <pre></pre> tags. Use <br /> to separate lines in HTML. The nl2br() function can help you to convert line breaks to HTML if needed.

Also, if you use single-quoted strings (your example has double quoted strings), \r and \n will not work. The only escape characters available in single quoted strings are \' and \.

share|improve this answer

Are you displaying the results in an HTML page? if so, HTML strips whitespace like newlines. You'd have to something like use '<br />' instead of '/r/n' in HTML.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.