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I have two functions that do the exact same thing but in two different types of struct and this two types of struct are very similar.

Imagine I have this two structs.

typedef struct nodeOne{
    Date *date;
    struct nodeOne *next;
    struct nodeOne *prev;
}NodeOne;

typedef struct nodeTwo{
    Date *date;
    struct nodeTwo *next;
    struct nodeTwo *prev;
}NodeTwo;

Since my function to destroy each of the list is almost the same (Just the type of the arguments are different) I would like to make just one function to make the two thins.

I have this two functions

void destroyListOne(NodeOne **head, NodeOne **tail){
    NodeOne *aux;

    while (*head != NULL){
        aux = *head;
        *head = (*head)->next;
        free(aux);
    }
    *tail = NULL;
}

and this one:

void destroyListTwo(NodeTwo **head, NodeTwo **tail){
    NodeTwo *aux;

    while (*head != NULL){
        aux = *head;
        *head = (*head)->next;
        free(aux);
    }
    *tail = NULL;
}

Since they are very similar I thought making something like this:

void destroyList(void **ini, void **end, int listType){

    if (listType == 0) {
        NodeOne *aux;
        NodeOne head = (NodeOne) ini;
        NodeOne tail = (NodeOne) ed;

    }
    else {
        NodeTwo *aux;
        NodeTwo head = (NodeTwo) ini;
        NodeTwo tail = (NodeTwo) ed;
    }

    while (*head != NULL){
        aux = *head;
        *head = (*head)->next;
        free(aux);
    }
    *tail = NULL;
}

As you may now this is not working but I want to know if this is possible to achieve.

I must maintain both of the structs as they are.

share|improve this question
1  
"this is not working" Please be more specific. – Brandon Yates Jun 6 '12 at 16:20
1  
Shouldn't head and tail be declared as pointers in your last functinon? – Brandon Yates Jun 6 '12 at 16:26
up vote 2 down vote accepted

As noted by @Dancrumb, there are some design issues here, and I wouldn't recommend doing what you're trying to do.

That said, the casting can be done, provided nodeOne and nodeTwo are always going to be the same (something I would never depend upon in production code).

You can just choose one, and always cast to it (shudder). Since they're the same structure with different names, the cast works:

void destroyList(void *ini, void *end, int listType){

    NodeOne *aux = NULL;
    NodeOne **head = ini;
    NodeOne **tail = end;

    while (*head != NULL){
        aux = *head;
        *head = (*head)->next;
        free(aux);
    }
    *tail = NULL;
}

Also note in C, you don't need the explicit cast, as void * can be implicitly converted to any other pointer type without a cast.

But seriously, please don't do this. It is fragile, un-maintainable, and bug-prone.


After a look at @Torp's answer, I wanted to elaborate a bit on the spirit of the question and my answer. With bug fixes to @Torp's code (it doesn't compile and there are several pointer issues), it could be made to work. That said, I still don't think you should make it work.

Especially when we're talking about C (as opposed to C++), I would definitely keep the destroy functions separate for separate list types. I try to avoid cut-and-paste code whenever possible, but in this case I think safety, clarity and maintainability win. My opinion, of course. Your mileage may vary :)

share|improve this answer
    
Oh, and if my answer doesn't make it clear enough, I 100% agree with Joe. Please don't do it except as an exercise. – Torp Jun 6 '12 at 17:07
    
Thanks will maintain my two functions. As you properly said this will be the best way to proceed – Favolas Jun 7 '12 at 18:32

As much as i hate to say it, this is why templates were invented in C++. Are you sure you can't use that?

Something like this should work:

void destroyList(void **ini, void **end, int listType)
{
    void *aux;
    void *head = ini;
    void *tail = end;


    while (*head != NULL){
        if (listType == 0) {
           aux = (NodeOne *)*head;
           *head = ((NodeOne*)*head)->next;
           free((NodeOne*)aux;
        } else {
           ... same thing with casts to NodeTwo* ...
        }
    }
    *tail = NULL;
}

Not sure i put all the type casts right everywhere, but you get the idea.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @Edwin, i promise i'll learn the SO formatting tags before 5k rep :) – Torp Jun 6 '12 at 17:02
    
No problem, actually the issue is that SO doesn't use formatting tags. Just indent your code blocks four spaces, and ditch the break tags. – Edwin Buck Jun 6 '12 at 17:55

If I was designing this, I'd have done:

typedef struct node{
    Date *date;
    struct node *next;
    struct node *prev;
} Node;

Since NodeOne and NodeTwo are identical, why have two different types?

If there's some reason that I'm missing, then I'd extend this:

typedef struct nodeOne {
    Node nodeInfo;
    /* additional */
} NodeOne

typedef struct nodeTwo {
    Node nodeInfo;
    /* additional */
} NodeTwo

Then, just pass in the nodeInfo field to your Node manipulation functions.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks but I must maintain all of my struct as they are. – Favolas Jun 6 '12 at 16:31

Write a #define containing all the function, just taking function name and struct type as parameters.

#define DECLARE_DESTRUCTION_FUNCT(_name_, _type_) void _name_(_type_ **head, _type_ **tail){\
_type_ *aux;\
\
while (*head != NULL){\
    aux = *head;\
    *head = (*head)->next;\
    free(aux);\
}\
*tail = NULL;\
}

DECLARE_DESTRUCTION_FUNCT(destroyListOne, NodeOne)
DECLARE_DESTRUCTION_FUNCT(destroyListTwo, NodeTwo)

This kindof replicates a template from C++. Brings a benefit of compile-time type checking.

share|improve this answer
    
It does, but you're still just using a macro to define two separate functions. Would you also have a macro to create the function call based on the type? Remind me never to debug your code :) (<-- I'm teasing about that last part, in case the smiley wasn't obvious) – JoeFish Jun 6 '12 at 17:09
    
@JoeFish It's still the only answer here which report errors at compile-time. I'd rather debug macros than smth relying entirely on crossing fingers that noone ever will add some more members in between in the future. Macros are powerfull tools for powerfull minds. – Agent_L Jun 11 '12 at 18:37
    
easy there, killer. I said I was only teasing. Yes, macros have their place, I never said they were evil. And while your answer does report errors at compile time, it does not answer the question - it only obfuscates the declaration of two separate functions, which is the opposite of what the OP asked. – JoeFish Jun 11 '12 at 18:46
    
@JoeFish yeah, they don't save any code space, just share one definition from human point of view. Sharing code so small won't gain any speed (but recurrent if's will slow down), so I took to the maintainability interpretation. – Agent_L Jun 12 '12 at 14:37

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