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I would like to be able to test if a List contain an object with a given key-value

For example, I would like to do something like Iterables.contains(l2, "lname", "Jordan")); instead of having to create all other Map objects like below in l2

//List<String> l = Arrays.asList("Mickael", "Jordan", "His Airness");
//System.out.println(Iterables.contains(l, "Jordan"));

Map<String, String> p1 = new HashMap<String, String>();
p1.put("fname", "Mickael");
p1.put("lname", "Jordan");
p1.put("nname", "His Airness");

Map<String, String> p2 = new HashMap<String, String>();
p2.put("fname", "Paul");
p2.put("lname", "Pierce");
p2.put("nname", "The Truth");
List<Map<String, String>> l2 = Arrays.asList(p1, p2);
Map<String, String> p3 = new HashMap<String, String>();
p3.put("fname", "Mickael"); //
p3.put("lname", "Jordan");
p3.put("nname", "His Airness"); //
System.out.println(Iterables.contains(l2, p3));

I'd like to know if there's such guava's function, and not doing a loop on l2 and testing each elt.get("lname")

Edit

3 solutions answered: trying to see which one is more perfomant

System.out.println(Iterables.any(l2, withEntry("lname", "Jordan"))); //@axtavt
System.out.println(has("lname", "Jordan")); //@JB
System.out.println(Iterables.any(l2, new KeyValuePredicate("lname", "Jordan"))); //@JB

public static Boolean has(final String key, final String value) {
    return Iterables.any(l2, new Predicate<Map<String, String>>() {
        @Override
        public boolean apply(Map<String, String> input) {
            return input.get(key).equals(value);
        }
    });
}

public static Predicate<Map<String, String>> withEntry(final String key, final String value) {
    return new Predicate<Map<String, String>>() {
        public boolean apply(Map<String, String> input) {
            return value.equals(input.get(key));
        }
    };
}

class KeyValuePredicate implements Predicate<Map<String, String>>{
private String key;
private String value;
public KeyValuePredicate(String key, String value) {
    super();
    this.key = key;
    this.value = value;
}
@Override
public boolean apply(Map<String, String> arg0) {
    // TODO Auto-generated method stub
    return arg0.get(key).equals(value);
}

}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted
return Iterables.any(l2, new Predicate<Map<String, String>>() {
    @Override
    public boolean apply(Map<String, String> input) {
        return input.get("lname").equals("Jordan");
    }
});

But you're using maps when you should use objects with properties.

Of course, if you need to do that multiple times, with various properties, you should transform the predicate into a non-anonymous, reusable class:

return Iterables.any(l2, new KeyValuePredicate("lname", "Jordan"));
share|improve this answer
    
KeyValuePredicate seems not existing in my guava version (r08) –  user1125394 Jun 6 '12 at 16:56
1  
Guava contributor here: @JBNizet is suggesting that you make your own KeyValuePredicate class, not referring to something already in Guava. This is definitely the recommended solution, if (for some inexplicable reason) you don't want to iterate over the list (though you should, and you should also make the maps into proper objects instead of leaving them as maps). –  Louis Wasserman Jun 6 '12 at 16:57
    
in terms of perfomance the simple loop is necessarily faster? –  user1125394 Jun 6 '12 at 17:20
    
Iterables.any is no magic. It loops over the list to find a matching element. Both should be equivalent, or at least the difference should be negligible. –  JB Nizet Jun 6 '12 at 17:27
1  
Should you want to perform many lookups, you can reduce the O(L * N) complexity (L = lookups, N = number of elements in list) to O(L) by transforming your list to a Multimap. Do sth like this: Multimap<String, String> index = Multimaps.index(l2, MapFunctions.get("fname"); assertTrue(!index.get("Jordan").isEmpty()); You'll have to make the MapFunctions.get("fname") yourself. But JB Nizet is right: most likely you want to create classes instead of Map lookups. –  Dibbeke Jun 8 '12 at 18:14

You can implement an appropriate Predicate and use Iterables.any():

public Predicate<Map<String, String>> withEntry(final String key, final String value) {
    return new Predicate<Map<String, String>>() {
        public boolean apply(Map<String, String> input) {
            return value.equals(input.get(key));
        }
    };
}

System.out.println(Iterables.any(l2, withEntry("lname", "Jordan")));
share|improve this answer
    
that works fine, trying to see if another solution is more perf –  user1125394 Jun 6 '12 at 17:00

Well this is straightforward.

You should create a proper entity class:

public class Person {

    private String fName;
    private String lName;
    private String nName;

    public Person(String fName, String lName, String nName) {
        this.fName = fName;
        this.lName = lName;
        this.nName = nName;
    }

    public String getFName() {
        return fName;
    }

    public String getLName() {
        return lName;
    }

    public String getNName() {
        return nName;
    }

}

Then you can do the following:

import java.util.*;
public class Test {

    public static void main (String [] args) {

        List<Person> list = new ArrayList<Person>();
        Person p1 = new Person("Mickael", "Jordan", "His Airness");

        for (Person person : list) {
            if (person.getFName().equals("Mickael")) {
                System.out.println("Mickael is in the list!");
                break;
            }
        }
    }
}
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