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I'm pretty new to Java but I need to write something like this C# code (this is hand-typed prototype just to illustrate what I need)

private void ParentFunc()
{
    var worker = new WorkerClass()

    worker.DoWork(e => console.Write("Progress" + e));


}

public class WorkerClass()
{
    public method DoWork(Action<int> callback)
    {
        for (int i=1; i<1000; i++) callback.Invoke(i);  
    }
}

Little explanation. I'm using AsyncTask in android and calling outside processor classed but would like them to signal back so I can publishProgress. I prefer not to put interface over my AsyncTask

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3  
Wait for java 8 :) –  Torious Jun 6 '12 at 17:21
2  
possible duplicate of Callback functions in Java –  assylias Jun 6 '12 at 17:21

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Since closures are not supported yet you have to use interface and anonymous inner class.

private void ParentFunc {
    WorkerClass worker = new WorkerClass();

    worker.doWork(new Callback<Integer>() {
        public void invoke(Integer arg) {
            System.out.println("Progress" + arg);
        }
    });
}

public class WorkerClass {
    public doWork(Callback<Integer> callback) {
        for (int i=1; i<1000; i++) callback.invoke(i);  
    }
}

public interface Callback<T> {
    public void invoke(T arg);
}
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In java, you use anonymous classes implementing interfaces. This is somewhat more verbose, but it works just fine:

interface MyAction {
    void doit(String str);
}

class WorkerClass {
    void doWork(MyAction action);
}

void main(String args[]) {
    WorkerClass worker = new WorkerClass();
    worker.doWork(new MyAction {
        public void doit(String e) {
            System.out.println("Progress" + e)
        }
    });
}
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var? Is this Java or C#? –  Eng.Fouad Jun 6 '12 at 17:34
    
@Eng.Fouad Oops, I've been coding in C# for too long :) Thanks! –  dasblinkenlight Jun 6 '12 at 17:37

With the aid of a support class:

interface CallBack<P>
{
  public void callback(P p);
}

class MyCallBack implements CallBack<String> {
  public void callBack(String p) {
    System.out.println(p);
  }
}

class WorkerClass {
  public void doWork(CallBack<String> callback)
  {
    // do work
    callback.callBack("Done!");
  }
}

WorkerClass wc = new WorkerClass();
wc.doWork(new MyCallBack());

I'm not going to suggest you to use anonymous classes because I find them quite verbose until a slicker syntax won't be available but it's just a matter of personal taste, I end up losing my self between braces when I use them..

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It is possible with java 8. See my answer to the duplicate question:

http://stackoverflow.com/a/26776520/1206998

Use a function as argument:

import java.util.function.Function;

public String applyFunction(Function<String,String> function){
        return function.apply("what ever");
}

Call

// with someObject.someMethod(String) => String
xxx.applyFunction(someObject::someMethod);
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