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I extracted terms from one column of a data list. Now these terms are in an unstructured list (Or is it a vector? I'm not sure how to tell unfortunately.). This is how the beginning looks like now:

> data$C1  
 [1] "GERMANY"         "GERMANY"         "GERMANY"         "GERMANY"        "FRANCE"         "FRANCE"          "GERMANY"        "ITALY"  

For further analysis I'd like to reassign these terms to the records of a data list I originally extracted them from. In my example the first record contains three terms, the second two, the third and fourth two each, etc. So this would be the correct output:

> data$C1  
 [1] "GERMANY"        "GERMANY"         "GERMANY"  
 [2] "GERMANY"  
 [3] "FRANCE"         "FRANCE"  
 [4] "GERMANY"        "ITALY"  

This is how I can count the number of terms in each record:

> count <- sapply(data$C1, length)  
> count  
 [1] 3 1 2 2  

And this is how I can observe that the eighth term belongs to the fourth record, e.g.:

> number <- rep(1:length(count), count)  
> number  
 [1]   1   1   1   2   3   3   4   4  
> number[8]  
 [1] 4  

But how can I use these statements to achieve the desired output? Once again: I'd like to assign the first three terms to the first record, the next term (the fourth one overall) to the second record, the next two (numbers five and six in the list) to the third record, the seventh and eight one to the fourth record, etc. How can this be done?

Thank you very much in advance!

Edit:
I imported many tab-delimited text files into R, which turns them into one big data list. There are 55 columns (One of them is data$C1.) and each text file has up to 501 rows (the header plus 500 records). data$C1 contains address strings. I split these into single addresses and extracted the country names from them. In order to make the distinction between the original column and the unstructured list clearer I renamed them.

> data$C1 #original before extraction (each line is a new record)  
 [1] "UNIV POTSDAM,DEPT PHYS,D-14415 POTSDAM,GERMANY; UNIV OLDENBURG,DEPT CHEM,D-26111 OLDENBURG,GERMANY; TECH UNIV CAROLO WILHELMINA BRAUNSCHWEIG,INST ORGAN CHEM,D-38106 BRAUNSCHWEIG,GERMANY"  
 [2] "TECH UNIV BERLIN,FACHBEREICH MATH,D-10623 BERLIN,GERMANY"  
 [3] "UNIV GRENOBLE 1,F-38041 GRENOBLE,FRANCE; UNIV PARIS 06,PARIS,FRANCE"  
 [4] "UNIV AUGSBURG, FACHBEREICH PHYS, D-86135 AUGSBURG, GERMANY; JOINT RES CTR ISPRA, MARINE ENVIRONM UNIT, I-21020 ISPRA, ITALY"  
 ...  

This is the current output of the extracted terms:

C1a
[1] "GERMANY" "GERMANY" "GERMANY" "GERMANY" "FRANCE" "FRANCE" "GERMANY" "ITALY"
...

This is would be the correct output I'm looking for:

> C1a #extracted terms  
 [1] "GERMANY"        "GERMANY"         "GERMANY"  
 [2] "GERMANY"  
 [3] "FRANCE"         "FRANCE"  
 [4] "GERMANY"        "ITALY"  
 ...  

These eight elements are just an example of the beginning / top of the data list. Its four records contain eight extracted terms:

> tapply(C1a, number, c)  
 Error in tapply(data$C1, number, c) : all arguments must have the same length  
> length(number)  
 [1] 4  
> length(data$C1)  
 [1] 4  
> length(C1a)  
 [1] 8  

Can one of the other columns can be used to reassign the terms? It's data$UT (Unique Article Identifier) and every record has a unique one. Examples for values are:

WOS:000300676300055  
WOS:A1995QQ99100006  

Would anybody be so kind as to help me achieve the correct output, please?

share|improve this question
    
When you extract the list, couldn't you create a data structure that associates each element with some kind of identifier? So, for instance, a unique ID number for each record? What did the data come from originally? –  TARehman Jun 6 '12 at 19:19
    
Yes, if you're happy to post the original data we can see if it's possible to clean up the solution I posted :) –  Tim P Jun 6 '12 at 19:37
    
Hey user0815 - you didn't tick the solution so wanted to check it all worked ok for you?! –  Tim P Jun 7 '12 at 6:29
    
Thank you for your comment, @TARehman! Actually there already is a column in my data structure which contains a unique identifier: data$UT How could I use this to correctly re-assign the terms? The data is tab-delimited text files downloaded from the Web of Science. Where shall I upload an example to? –  user0815 Jun 7 '12 at 11:20
    
@Tim P: See above, please! I only got back to it now. –  user0815 Jun 7 '12 at 11:21

1 Answer 1

I'd propose:

tapply(data$C1,number,c)

Result obtained:

$`1`
[1] "GERMANY" "GERMANY" "GERMANY"

$`2`
[1] "GERMANY"

$`3`
[1] "FRANCE" "FRANCE"

$`4`
[1] "GERMANY" "ITALY"  

This applies the concatenate (c) function to the elements in data$C1 that share a common value of number. The result is a list so use double brackets to refer to its elements (i.e. [[1]], [[2]], [[3]], [[4]]).

Hope this helps :)

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much for your solution, Tim P! Unfortunately, it gives me an error because data$C1 and number have different lengths since there's usually more than one term in a record ... Do you have any idea how to make it work despite this? –  user0815 Jun 7 '12 at 11:11
    
Could you explain a little more about the data, in particular, data$C1? In your explanation this looked to be a vector containing 8 elements, and number also had a length of 8 (you defined it above). When you say "there's usually more than one term in a record", what do you mean? In the result above, the first record (the first item in the list) has three records (all "GERMANY"). Is this not what you meant?! :) –  Tim P Jun 7 '12 at 12:43
    
I edited to add more information at the bottom of my question. Is it less confusing now? So the first record (the first item in the list) has three terms extracted from it (all "GERMANY"). –  user0815 Jun 7 '12 at 15:11

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