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I know many ways to find the distance between two colors - Euclidean or other, in any color space - RGB, HSV or other, but I am now coming upon a problem much more simpler, find the distance between two colors in a grayscale image and I am not sure how to face it.

Lets say we have two pixels with two different grays, a = 122 and b = 201.

How would you define the distance? Is it 79? Or using the Euclidean distance for instance, knowing that Ra = 122 Ga = 122 Ba = 122 and same for Rb = 201, Gb = 201, Bb = 201, which gives an Euclidean distance of ~136.

I've computed the two different methods with quite a number of examples, the results are very different and I am not sure which approach to choose. Any idea?

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2 Answers 2

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"Common definitions make use of the Euclidean distance in a device independent color space"

Taken from Wikipedia: Color Difference

Even though in grayscale R = G = B, a pixel still has all three values. I would stick with Euclidean distance, it seems to be the convention.

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Seems like I got two opposite answers, but I tend to agree more with yours. I think I will indeed stick the Euclidean distance. –  George Jun 6 '12 at 18:15

I don't know much about the subject but I think it depends on what you want to achieve. Say you are working with geographic data and you need to choose a distance function between two points. You may select a Manhattan norm if those two points are in a city and you consider that distance to be better a approximation than the 2-norm (euclidean) for what a person would need to walk or whatever...

However, given that gray scale colors are unidimensional I would think that a distance function should be unidimensional as well. It does not need to be |a - b|, but I think it should only consider the one parameter (component, dimension) for each color.

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