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I have a list of lists: something like:

data = [[240, 240, 239],
        [250, 249, 237], 
        [242, 239, 237],
        [240, 234, 233]]

And I want to average this out like

[average_column_1, average_column_2, average_column_3]

My piece of code is like not very elegant. It is the naive way of going thru the list, keeping the sum in seperate container and then dividing by number of elements.

I think there is a pythonic way to do this. Any suggestions? Thanks

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3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Pure Python:

from __future__ import division
def mean(a):
    return sum(a) / len(a)
a =  [[240, 240, 239],
      [250, 249, 237], 
      [242, 239, 237],
      [240, 234, 233]]
print map(mean, zip(*a))

printing

[243.0, 240.5, 236.5]

NumPy:

a = numpy.array([[240, 240, 239],
                 [250, 249, 237], 
                 [242, 239, 237],
                 [240, 234, 233]])
print numpy.mean(a, axis=0)
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Preferable with from itertools import imap, izip –  schlamar Jun 6 '12 at 18:33
3  
@ms4py: from future_builtins import map, zip if you decide to go this route –  gdbdmdb Jun 6 '12 at 18:47
1  
+1 neat .. looking at the first solution is just proof how how sleek Python code can be –  Levon Jun 6 '12 at 20:30
1  
map isn't "pythonic" in any way, and who needs numpy here? And this is the accepted answer? –  Oleh Prypin Jun 7 '12 at 3:27
3  
@BlaXpirit: The NumPy solution is easier to read, more concise, faster and uses less memory, so I mentioned it for people who are using NumPy anyway. And why do you think map() exists, and still exists in Python 3.x? –  Sven Marnach Jun 7 '12 at 7:56
data = [[240, 240, 239],
        [250, 249, 237], 
        [242, 239, 237],
        [240, 234, 233]]
avg = [float(sum(col))/len(col) for col in zip(*data)]
# [243.0, 240.5, 236.5]

This works because zip(*data) will give you a list with the columns grouped, the float() call is only necessary on Python 2.x, which uses integer division unless from __future__ import division is used.

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I believe this answer is the best. It was also the first. –  Oleh Prypin Jun 7 '12 at 3:28
    
@BlaXpirit: There is far too much emphasis on speed on SO – the important thing should be quality. Also note that this answer came third (or fourth, if we count the deleted answer). –  Sven Marnach Jun 7 '12 at 8:27

Use zip(), like so:

averages = [sum(col) / float(len(col)) for col in zip(*data)]

zip() takes multiple iterable arguments, and returns slices of those iterables (as tuples), until one of the iterables cannot return anything more. In effect, it performs a transpose operation, akin to matrices.

>>> data = [[240, 240, 239],
...         [250, 249, 237], 
...         [242, 239, 237],
...         [240, 234, 233]]

>>> [list(col) for col in zip(*data)]
[[240, 250, 242, 240],
 [240, 249, 239, 234],
 [239, 237, 237, 233]]

By performing sum() on each of those slices, you effectively get the column-wise sum. Simple divide by the length of the column to get the mean.

Side point: In Python 2.x, division on integers drops the decimal by default, which is why float() is called to "promote" the divisor to a floating point type.

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Don't forget to divide by the length ;) –  mgilson Jun 6 '12 at 18:07
4  
Worth adding an explanation: zip is a function that takes multiple sequences and returns tuples on a "column-by-column" basis. So it returns (x[0][0], x[1][0], x[2][0]) then (x[1][0], x[1][1], x[1][2]) and so on. It will stop retrieving as soon as it runs out of items for a given line, however. It's easier to diagram in code, care to show how it works? –  Christopher Pfohl Jun 6 '12 at 18:10

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