Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

i am new in programming and in stackoverflow that is why i sometime maybe can have simple questions when i code something and want to get input fromthe file`

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
   int len1=0;
   FILE* p;
   char a;
   char b[10];
   p = fopen(argv[1],"r");
   while (1)
   {
      a = fgetc(p);

      if(a == ' ') break;
      else
      {
         len1++; 
         b[len1-1] = a;
      }
   }
   printf("%c\n", b0);
   return 0;
}

it gives segmentation fault and what is the reason?

share|improve this question
1  
Welcome - I have formatted the code to make it easier to read. – Ed Heal Jun 6 '12 at 18:14
1  
Same question posted 20 minutes earlier – JoeFish Jun 6 '12 at 18:22

You have a buffer overrun. If you change your while loop to stop after reading ten characters, even if space has not been reached, you should do fine.

Additionally, you are passing a character at b[len1] into printf, and have it interpreted as a pointer. This will segfault no matter what.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
   int len1=0;
   FILE* p;
   char a;
   char b[10+1]; // <<== need one more byte for the terminator
   if (argc != 2)
   {
      fprintf(stderr, "Need to supply a filename\n");
      return (-1);
   }
   p = fopen(argv[1],"r");
   if (p == NULL)
   {
      fprintf(stderr, "Cannot open file %s\n", argv[1]);
      return(-2);
   }
   while (len1 < 10) // <<== avoid buffer overruns
   {
      a = fgetc(p);

      if(a == ' ') break;
      else
      {
         len1++; 
         b[len1-1] = a;
      }
   }
   b[len1] = '\0'; // <<== Don't forget to zero-terminate
   printf("%s\n", b); // <<== Pass the buffer, not the last character from it
   return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
it also gives segmentation fault in gcc compiler – Miribra Stacker Jun 6 '12 at 18:21
    
@MiribraStacker There's probably something wrong with the file from which you are reading. I ran this at ideone using standard input link, and it runs fine, both with and without a space in the input. Add a check after fopen to see if p is not NULL. – dasblinkenlight Jun 6 '12 at 18:25
    
In that way it works, but I need to execute my program like ./a.out input.txt – Miribra Stacker Jun 6 '12 at 18:30
    
@MiribraStacker Did you add the check for NULL after the call to fopen? What does it return? – dasblinkenlight Jun 6 '12 at 18:33
1  
@Miribra Shacker - Added some error checking to the code (dasblinkenligh - hope you do not mind) – Ed Heal Jun 6 '12 at 18:39

char b[10] only has 10 elements. len1 is incremented every iteration of an infinite loop. This quickly becomes > 10. Eventually somewhere past 10 you write into some memory you don't have access too. Hence the seg fault.

share|improve this answer

Instead of the while (1), you should test the loop index against the size of your table b (so 10)

What do you want to do exactly ?

share|improve this answer

You have two problems

  1. What happens when you read the file and the first 10 characters are not a space? The array b will be esxhausted.
  2. printf is trying to print a string. b[len1] is a character.
share|improve this answer

There are two logical bugs in your program ::
1.while(1) you are having an non-terminating loop, it will result into stackoverflow.
2. char b[10] here, b is a char array of size 10 i.e. b[0] to b[9], but as in your program len1++ is executing for every iteration, which will access memory beyond b[9].

To overcome these issues use while(len1<10).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.