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What should I use to get semantics equivalent to AutoResetEvent in Java? (See this question for ManualResetEvent).

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5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

@user249654's answer looked promising. I added some unit tests to verify it, and indeed it works as expected.

I also added an overload of waitOne that takes a timeout.

The code is here in case anyone else finds it useful:

Unit Test

import org.junit.Assert;
import org.junit.Test;

import static java.lang.System.currentTimeMillis;

/**
 * @author Drew Noakes http://drewnoakes.com
 */
public class AutoResetEventTest
{
    @Test
    public void synchronisesProperly() throws InterruptedException
    {
        final AutoResetEvent event1 = new AutoResetEvent(false);
        final AutoResetEvent event2 = new AutoResetEvent(false);
        final int loopCount = 10;
        final int sleepMillis = 50;

        Thread thread1 = new Thread(new Runnable()
        {
            @Override
            public void run()
            {
                try {
                    for (int i = 0; i < loopCount; i++)
                    {
                        long t = currentTimeMillis();
                        event1.waitOne();
                        Assert.assertTrue("Time to wait should be within 5ms of sleep time",
                                Math.abs(currentTimeMillis() - t - sleepMillis) < 5);
                        Thread.sleep(sleepMillis);
                        t = currentTimeMillis();
                        event2.set();
                        Assert.assertTrue("Time to set should be within 1ms", currentTimeMillis() - t <= 1);
                    }
                } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                    Assert.fail();
                }
            }
        });

        Thread thread2 = new Thread(new Runnable()
        {
            @Override
            public void run()
            {
                try {
                    for (int i = 0; i < loopCount; i++)
                    {
                        Thread.sleep(sleepMillis);
                        long t = currentTimeMillis();
                        event1.set();
                        Assert.assertTrue("Time to set should be within 1ms", currentTimeMillis() - t <= 1);
                        t = currentTimeMillis();
                        event2.waitOne();
                        Assert.assertTrue("Time to wait should be within 5ms of sleep time",
                                Math.abs(currentTimeMillis() - t - sleepMillis) < 5);
                    }
                } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                    Assert.fail();
                }
            }
        });

        long t = currentTimeMillis();

        thread1.start();
        thread2.start();

        int maxTimeMillis = loopCount * sleepMillis * 2 * 2;

        thread1.join(maxTimeMillis);
        thread2.join(maxTimeMillis);

        Assert.assertTrue("Thread should not be blocked.", currentTimeMillis() - t < maxTimeMillis);
    }

    @Test
    public void timeout() throws InterruptedException
    {
        AutoResetEvent event = new AutoResetEvent(false);

        int timeoutMillis = 100;
        long t = currentTimeMillis();
        event.waitOne(timeoutMillis);
        long took = currentTimeMillis() - t;
        Assert.assertTrue("Timeout should have occurred, taking within 5ms of the timeout period, but took " + took,
                Math.abs(took - timeoutMillis) < 5);
    }

    @Test
    public void noBlockIfInitiallyOpen() throws InterruptedException
    {
        AutoResetEvent event = new AutoResetEvent(true);

        long t = currentTimeMillis();
        event.waitOne(200);
        Assert.assertTrue("Should not have taken very long to wait when already open",
                Math.abs(currentTimeMillis() - t) < 5);
    }
}

AutoResetEvent with overload that accepts a timeout

public class AutoResetEvent
{
    private final Object _monitor = new Object();
    private volatile boolean _isOpen = false;

    public AutoResetEvent(boolean open)
    {
        _isOpen = open;
    }

    public void waitOne() throws InterruptedException
    {
        synchronized (_monitor) {
            while (!_isOpen) {
                _monitor.wait();
            }
            _isOpen = false;
        }
    }

    public void waitOne(long timeout) throws InterruptedException
    {
        synchronized (_monitor) {
            long t = System.currentTimeMillis();
            while (!_isOpen) {
                _monitor.wait(timeout);
                // Check for timeout
                if (System.currentTimeMillis() - t >= timeout)
                    break;
            }
            _isOpen = false;
        }
    }

    public void set()
    {
        synchronized (_monitor) {
            _isOpen = true;
            _monitor.notify();
        }
    }

    public void reset()
    {
        _isOpen = false;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hey Drew Noakes, isn't the function waitOne() supposed to return a boolean like in the C# version? –  Masterminder Aug 29 at 1:08
    
@Masterminder, what change would you propose? –  Drew Noakes Aug 29 at 9:39
    
I like your answer, but would you have to make a boolean WaitOne() in order to mimic the one at this link: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/58195swd%28v=vs.110%29.aspx ? My proposition would be that it would return the _isOpen variable you have but the key idea is it will block the current thread until the signal is received. What do you think? –  Masterminder Aug 29 at 12:46
class AutoResetEvent {

  private final Object monitor = new Object();
  private volatile boolean open = false;

  public AutoResetEvent(boolean open) {
    this.open = open;
  }

  public void waitOne() throws InterruptedException {
    synchronized (monitor) {
      while (open == false) { 
        monitor.wait();
      }
      open = false; // close for other
    }

  }

  public void set() {
    synchronized (monitor) {
      open = true;
      monitor.notify(); // open one 
    }
  }

  public void reset() {//close stop
    open = false;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This looks promising, but does it mean that one thread cannot call set the event if another is waiting? The thread that's waiting holds a lock on monitor, right? –  Drew Noakes Dec 11 '12 at 11:43
    
Seems that I was wrong, and that the lock is released during the wait. See the similar comments on this answer. –  Drew Noakes Dec 11 '12 at 12:06

I was able to get CyclicBarrier to work for my purposes.

Here is the C# code I was trying to reproduce in Java (it's just a demonstration program I wrote to isolate the paradigm, I now use it in C# programs I write to generate video in real time, to provide accurate control of the frame rate):

using System;
using System.Timers;
using System.Threading;

namespace TimerTest
{
    class Program
    {
        static AutoResetEvent are = new AutoResetEvent(false);
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            System.Timers.Timer t = new System.Timers.Timer(1000);
            t.Elapsed += new ElapsedEventHandler(delegate { are.Set(); });
            t.Enabled = true;
            while (true)
            {
                are.WaitOne();
                Console.WriteLine("main");
            }
        }
    }
}

and here is the Java code I came up with to do the same thing (using the CyclicBarrier class as suggested in a previous answer):

import java.util.Timer;
import java.util.TimerTask;
import java.util.concurrent.CyclicBarrier;

public class TimerTest2 {
    static CyclicBarrier cb;

    static class MyTimerTask extends TimerTask {
        private CyclicBarrier cb;
        public MyTimerTask(CyclicBarrier c) { cb = c; }

        public void run() { 
            try { cb.await(); } 
            catch (Exception e) { } 
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        cb = new CyclicBarrier(2);
        Timer t = new Timer();
        t.schedule(new MyTimerTask(cb), 1000, 1000);

        while (true) {
            try { cb.await(); } 
            catch (Exception e) { }
            System.out.println("main");
        }
    }
}
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I believe what you're looking for is either a CyclicBarrier or a CountDownLatch.

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CountDownLatch helped a bit, but it's not exactly equivalent. Come on StackOverflow - it's impossible nobody implemented this yet... –  ripper234 Jul 7 '09 at 18:30

import java.util.concurrent.TimeUnit;

import java.util.concurrent.locks.Condition;

import java.util.concurrent.locks.ReentrantLock;

public class AutoResetEvent {

private volatile boolean _signaled;
private ReentrantLock _lock;
private Condition _condition;

public AutoResetEvent(boolean initialState) {
    _signaled = initialState;
    _lock = new ReentrantLock();
    _condition = _lock.newCondition();
}

public void waitOne(long miliSecond) throws InterruptedException {
    _lock.lock();
    try {
        while (!_signaled)
            _condition.await(miliSecond, TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS);
        _signaled = false;
    } finally {
        _lock.unlock();
    }
}

public void waitOne() throws InterruptedException {
    _lock.lock();
    try {
        while (!_signaled)
            _condition.await();
        _signaled = false;
    } finally {
        _lock.unlock();
    }
}

public void set() {
    _lock.lock();
    try {
        _condition.signal();
        _signaled = true;
    } finally {
        _lock.unlock();
    }
}

public void reset() {
    _lock.lock();
    try {
        _signaled = false;
    } finally {
        _lock.unlock();
    }
}

}

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