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Not sure what the method is or how its achieved. But I'm interested in knowing about it to possibly use it in an upcoming project. What I am referring to is when a block element is at a particular X/Y axis it seems it stops acting as though it were a fixed position element otherwise the element acts as a fixed position element.

I most commonly see this with navigation, where the header and footer are large and the element will stop acting as a fixed element when it reaches the bottom of the header or top of the footer

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can do something like this,

$(window).scroll(function(){    
    if ($(this).scrollTop() > 250){ 
        $('#top').css('position','fixed'); 
    }
    else{
        $('#top').css('position','static');
    }
});

A better approach would be,

$(window).scroll(function(){    
    var top =  $('#top'); 
    if ($(this).scrollTop() > 250){
        if(top.css('position') !== 'fixed'){ 
            top.css('position','fixed'); 
        }
    }
    else{
        if(top.css('position') !== 'static'){
            top.css('position','static');
        }
    }
});
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There are plugins that will do this for you; this is one I've used before: link with relative success. Has great examples, too.

But if you want to do it yourself, it's not too difficult. The concept is slightly convoluted; if you change something's position to fixed, then it will not take up space, as it would if it was static.

When I came across this issue, I created a second item in the same place (or not, depending where you want it to appear), which is invisible. Then you implement a load/scroll event that checks if the window's scrollTop is greater than the top coordinate of the non-fixed object. If it is, show the fixed object.

Something like this:

$("#yourObject").each(function() { // The ID should be the FIXED object.
    var $me = $(this);
    var $heightRival = $("#anotherObject"); // This ID should be the non-fixed object.
    $me.hide(); // Hide your fixed div.
    $(window).bind("load scroll",function() {
        var offset = $heightRival.offset(); // Get the document offset of the base object.
        var height = $heightRival.outerHeight(); // Get the height of the base object.
        if ($(window).scrollTop() > offset.top+height)
            $target.show(); // Can be a fade in, slide in, whatever.
        else
            $target.hide(); // Can be a fade out, etc.
    });
});

This is just a rudimentary code but it should set you on the right track.

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Ahh the concepts JavaScript based, I always thought it was CSS/HTML based somehow. This gives me great insight, on the whole matter. Very cool, thank you. – chris Jun 6 '12 at 20:42

Take a look at this plugin, or the others like it: http://www.orangecoat.com/stickyscroll

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