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I'm trying to learn more about the workings of the C++ I/O stream library by extending std::streambuf. As a learning experiment, my goal is to simply create a custom stream which directs all output to std::cerr. It seems simple enough:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class my_ostreambuf : public std::streambuf
{
    public:

    protected:

    std::streamsize xsputn(const char * s, std::streamsize n)
    {
        std::cerr << "Redirecting to cerr: " << s << std::endl;
        return n;
    }

};

int main()
{
    my_ostreambuf buf;
    std::ostream os(&buf);
    os << "TEST";
}

This seems to work, since it prints Redirecting to cerr: TEST. The problem is that it doesn't work when a single character (as opposed to a string) is inserted into the stream via std::ostream::sputc. For example:

int main()
{
    my_ostreambuf buf;
    std::ostream os(&buf);
    os << "ABC"; // works
    std::string s("TEST");
    std::copy(s.begin(), s.end(), std::ostreambuf_iterator<char>(os)); // DOESN'T WORK
}

The problem I guess is that xsputn doesn't handle single character insertion. (I guess sputc doesn't call xsputn internally?) But, looking over the list of virtual protected functions in std::streambuf, I don't see any function I'm supposed to override that handles single character insertion.

So, how can I accomplish this?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Single-character output is handled by overflow. Here's how you might implement overflow in terms of xsputn if xsputn does the actual outputting:

int_type overflow(int_type c = traits_type::eof())
{
    if (c == traits_type::eof())
        return traits_type::eof();
    else
    {
        char_type ch = traits_type::to_char_type(c);
        return xsputn(&ch, 1) == 1 ? c : traits_type::eof();
    }
}
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So what is handled by sputc? –  0x499602D2 Dec 6 '13 at 0:55
    
@0x499602D2: sputc writes a character to the internal buffer maintained by the streambuf. This buffer is flushed when it's full or when the endl or flush manipulators are used (and in a few other circumstances). When the buffer is flushed, overflow is called with the next character that would go into the buffer if it weren't full (or with eof if the buffer is being flushed when it's not full). The idea is that overflow writes the contents of the buffer, plus the character passed as argument (if not eof), to the actual destination. (continued in next comment) –  HighCommander4 Dec 6 '13 at 7:38
    
@0x499602D2: So a functioning streambuf implementation can be written by just overriding overflow. xsputn is used when outputting a string of characters at once. Its default implementation just writes each character to the internal buffer, as if by sputc (where eventually they'll be processed by overflow). However, xsputn can be overridden do something more efficient, like bypass the buffer and write the string of characters to the destination directly. –  HighCommander4 Dec 6 '13 at 7:41
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