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I am still new to PHP and I was wondering which alternative would be better or maybe someone could suggest a better way.

I have a set of users and I have to track all of their interactions with posts. If a users taps on a button, it will add the post to a list and if they tap it again, it will remove the post, so would it be better to:

Have a column of a JSON array of postIDs stored in the table for each user (probably thousands).

-or-

Have a separate table with every save (combination of postID and userID) (probably millions) and return all results where the userID's match?

For the purposes of this question, there are two tables: Table A is users and Table B is posts. How should I store all of the user's saved posts?

EDIT: Sorry, but I didn't mention that posts will have multiple user interactions and users will have multiple post interactions (Many to Many relationship). I think that would affect Bob's answer.

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1  
B. its what a db is for – Dagon Jun 6 '12 at 20:38
1  
User's table has userID( primary key), username and other info you want to store about a user. Post's table will have a postID( also primary key ) and a foreign key from User's table ( userID), and message content. That way you will be able to keep track of all the messages a user have posted. – Bob Jun 6 '12 at 20:42
    
Can you show us the code you're working with? I.e. database structure? It'll be far easier to advise if we can go by that rather than loose descriptions. – ghoti Jun 6 '12 at 20:44
    
@Bob: I think you should post your comment as an answer. – Stefan Jun 6 '12 at 20:53
    
Sorry, but I didn't mention that posts will have multiple user interactions and users will have multiple post interactions (Many to Many relationship). I think that would affect Bob's answer. – RileyE Jun 6 '12 at 20:59
up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is an interesting question!

The solution really depends on your expected use case. If each user has a list of posts they've tagged, and that is all the information you need, it will be expedient to list these as a field in the user's table (or in their blob if you're using a nosql backend - a viable option if this is your use case!). There will be no impact on transmission time since the list will be the same size either way, but in this solution you will probably save on lookup time, since you're only using one table and dbs will optimize to keep this information close together.

On the other hand, if you have to be able to query a given post for all the users that have tagged it, then option two will be much better. In the former method, you'd have to query all users and see if each one had the post. In this option, you simply have to find all the relations and work from there. Presumably you'd have a user table, a post table and a user_post table with foreign keys to the first two tables. There are other ways to do this, but it necessitates maintaining multiple lists and cross checking each time, which is an expensive set of operations and error-prone.

Note that the latter option shouldn't choke on 'millions' of connections, since the db should be optimized for this sort of quick read. (pro tip: index the proper columns!) Do be careful about any data massage, though. One unnecessary for-loop will kill your performance.

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Thanks for the answer. I've just always been told that lists shouldn't be stored in tables. I am focussing on your first paragraph, because that is the need I have. So, having JSON data (an encoded array of postIDs) as a column/value for each user would be better than having a separate table of combinations of postIDs and userIDs? – RileyE Jun 7 '12 at 1:57
    
Again, 'better' is dependent on your use case. If there is no need for the data to be relational, then storing it as a list which can be easily manipulated in code is more scalable. (Requires less work for the database.) But make sure that is your use case! – Nathaniel Ford Jun 7 '12 at 2:01
    
Hmmm. Well, thats good and bad. Good, in the sense that my question has been answered. Bad that I went based off a different answer and built a third table that stores combinations of userIDs and postIDs (query userID to get all of the user's tagged posts, but I don't need it to be relational/multidirectional). – RileyE Jun 7 '12 at 2:04
    
If you're doing your database correctly, the relational mapping shouldn't really impact you unless you scale to the point beyond where you can have just one database server. Granted, that might be sooner, but don't sweat bullets over it! – Nathaniel Ford Jun 7 '12 at 16:58

For the purposes of this question, there are two tables: Table A is users and Table B is posts. How should I store all of the user's saved posts?

If each user has a unique ID of some sort (primary key), then ad a field to each post that refers to the unique ID of the user.

mysql> describe users;
+----------+------------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+
| Field    | Type             | Null | Key | Default | Extra          |
+----------+------------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+
| id       | int(11) unsigned | NO   | PRI | NULL    | auto_increment |
| email    | varchar(200)     | YES  |     | NULL    |                |
| username | varchar(20)      | YES  |     | NULL    |                |
+----------+------------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+

mysql> describe posts;
+---------+------------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+
| Field   | Type             | Null | Key | Default | Extra          |
+---------+------------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+
| id      | int(11) unsigned | NO   | PRI | NULL    | auto_increment |
| user    | int(11) unsigned | NO   |     | NULL    |                |
| text    | text             | YES  |     | NULL    |                |
+---------+------------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+

Then to get posts for a user, for example:

SELECT text
 FROM posts
 WHERE user=5;

Or to get all the posts from a particular organization:

SELECT posts.text,users.username
 FROM posts,users
 WHERE post.user=users.id
   AND users.email LIKE '%@example.com';
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Hi. This won't be where a user has created a post, but rather where a user has tagged a post. So, every user can tag a single post. – RileyE Jun 7 '12 at 2:00
    
Then what are the "user's saved posts"? They're not the user's after all, but mere the posts in which a user has expressed interest? Can more than one user express interest in the same post? Can a user express interest in more than one post? I gather the answers to these questions don't matter now, since you've already chosen a winner from these answers. – ghoti Jun 7 '12 at 3:06

I think it would make sense to keep a third table that would be all the post status data.

If your user interface shows, say, 50 posts per page, then the UI only needs to keep track of 50 posts at a time. They'll all have unique IDs in your database, so that shouldn't be a problem.

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