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How can I get only the updates-since-last-fetch from an RSS feed? The various code snippets I have seen seem to be polling the url periodically. But that's very dependent on:

  1. How active the feed has been during the polling interval and,
  2. The number of items the server returns as its policy.

This poses a risk of losing some items by infrequent polling, polling way too often and add bandwidth costs, or both.

The feeds I am considering also seem to update Last-modified to current time, which is not very helpful.

Is there some API element that will allow something like this?

Thanks

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Kevin, thanks for the edit. Reads so much clearer. –  Dinesh Jun 26 '12 at 4:47

1 Answer 1

Unless the feed you're pinging allows you to send a parameter of when the cut off date is, you can't reliably work out when new items have been added since your last poll without downloading the feed again.

You're back to where you started with the periodic polling to see what new items exist, if any.

You can then hash the feed to check if it's different from last time and skip checking for new items if it's the same. Or you could check its cache headers, but then you'll have to assume the server is sending it back correctly and/or you're not also back to the cases where like the Last-Modified tag it's just not reliable at all.

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Thanks, it looks as if I must do periodic sampling. That's basically where I am currently. <p/> Re Hashing, thanks for the link with a good discussion. To toss in another thought, probably something like a small SAXP processor might be faster, if I find myself that resource constrained. –  Dinesh Jun 26 '12 at 4:48

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