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Is there a way to generate a random UUID, which consists only of numbers?

I don't want to have chars in the UUID only integers .. how to do that in java ?

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marked as duplicate by Vlad Lazarenko, Greg Kopff, Jack Maney, stevedbrown, James Allardice Jun 6 '12 at 22:24

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

5  
Once you do it you cannot call it UUID anymore. –  user405725 Jun 6 '12 at 20:52
    
@VladLazarenko: Why not? –  cha0site Jun 6 '12 at 20:53
1  
A UUID is universally unique, not just unique to your system. A UUID must have letters and numbers. Are you just looking for an integer ID that is unique to your system? –  woz Jun 6 '12 at 20:55
    
Just use an atomically autoincrement sequence like as DBs have. –  BalusC Jun 6 '12 at 20:57
1  
A UUID is a 128-bit number. You may represent it with 32 hex digits and 4 hyphens. You may represent it with only As and Bs - just convert it to binary. You can represent it in BASE64. It's a number! –  cha0site Jun 6 '12 at 21:01

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You need 2 longs to store a UUID.

UUID myuuid = UUID.randomUUID();
long highbits = myuuid.getMostSignificantBits();
long lowbits = myuuid.getLeastSignificantBits();
System.out.println("My UUID is: " + highbits + " " + lowbits);
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This will potentially have - signs. –  corsiKa Jun 6 '12 at 21:02
    
@corsiKa: I realize that. This code represents a UUID using 2 integers. –  cha0site Jun 6 '12 at 21:05
  • Use the getMostSigBits() and getLeastSigBits() to get the long values.
  • Then use those long values to populate a byte[].
  • Then use that byte[] to make a BigInteger object.
  • That BigInteger's toString() will be a UUID that may potentially be negative. You can get around that issue by potentially replacing the - sign with a 1, ot some other similar technique.

I haven't tested this, but whatevs #gimmetehcodez

long hi = id.getMostSignificantBits();
long lo = id.getLeastSignificantBits();
byte[] bytes = ByteBuffer.allocate(16).putLong(hi).putLong(lo).array();
BigInteger big = new BigInteger(bytes);
String numericUuid = big.toString().replace('-','1'); // just in case
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You could also fix the negative problem by adding a 0 byte in the correct place of the byte[]. –  cha0site Jun 6 '12 at 21:07
    
Sample code would be nice. –  eskatos Oct 30 '14 at 11:10
    
You... you have got to be kidding me. This literally uses the set by step instructions complete with what methods to call and everything. –  corsiKa Oct 30 '14 at 14:59

If what you need is just a random number, user Random class and call nextInt()

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This will generate a v4 UUID with no characters, however it becomes significantly less unique.

final int[] pattern = { 8, 4, 4, 4, 12 };

final int[] versionBit = { 2, 0 }; /* 3rd group, first bit */
final int version = 4;

final int[] reservedBit = { 3, 0 }; /* 4rd group, first bit */
final int reserved = 8; /* 8, 9, A, or B */

Random rand = new Random();

String numericUuid = "";

for (int i = 0; i < pattern.length; i++) {
    for (int j = 0; j < pattern[i]; j++) {
        if (i == versionBit[0] && j == versionBit[1])
            numericUuid += version;
        else if (i == reservedBit[0] && j == reservedBit[1])
            numericUuid += reserved;
        else
            numericUuid += rand.nextInt(10);
    }

    numericUuid += "-";
}

UUID uuid = UUID.fromString(numericUuid.substring(0, numericUuid.length() - 1));
System.out.println(uuid);

You can also brute-force one using the following code:

UUID uuid = UUID.randomUUID();

while (StringUtils.containsAny(uuid.toString(), new char[] { 'a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f' })) {
    uuid = UUID.randomUUID();
}

System.out.println(uuid);
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