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This might sound like a weird question but I don't get it...

Let's say I have an application which connects to a server to do some stuff. This connect might fail and throw an exception which I can catch.

try {
  Client.connect();
} catch (System.Exception ex) {
  // Do some exception handling...
} finally {
  // Do some cleanup...
}

However, in case that the connect is succcesful the application shall continue...

try {
  Client.connect();
} catch (System.Exception ex) {
  // Do some exception handling...
} finally {
  // Do some cleanup...
}

// Talk to the server...

The "server talking" however is executed in any case. It doesn't matter if the exception occured or not.

How can I make sure that the "server talking" is only executed if the connect was successful? Do I have to move all of the following code inside the trystatement? What is a clean way to program such a behavior?

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It all depends on what you're trying to accomplish. In some cases it may make sense to return in the catch block, particularly if the method returns a status. If the try block is in a loop, you may simply wish to continue to the next iteration in the catch. Though it may be a suprise to the people who brought you ERROR_SUCCESS, not every exception is a failure. –  HABO Jun 6 '12 at 21:45

5 Answers 5

up vote 13 down vote accepted

"Talk to the server" should happen in the try block, right after

Client.connect();
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2  
After thinking a little, this is probably the best option: mainly, it avoids code duplication in every catch block (there could be more than one, of course). Still, I think there refactoring the content of the try to a new method might be a good idea. –  Kobi Jun 6 '12 at 21:02
    
After having read all the answers this answer -in combination with Kobi's comment- seems to be the most robust way to do it. Thanks! –  Robert Jun 6 '12 at 21:07
1  
This may or may not be a good choice depending on the use case. There may be cases where you get an exception while "talking to the server", handle the exception and continue on talking. If you wrap it in the same try-catch as the one used for Connect, you pretty much have to clean up and leave as soon as you receive one exception. Again, it depends on the use case, but I generally prefer multiple try-catch blocks rather than a single one that wraps everything. –  Eren Ersönmez Jun 6 '12 at 21:16
    
@Eren: In this case I would argue for a nested try block rather than serial ones, but as you say, depends on the exact use case. –  Eric J. Jun 6 '12 at 21:24

The easiest way is to just set a boolean. But there are many many many ways to deal with this.

bool connectionError = false;

try {
    // connect
} catch (...) {
    connectionError = true;
} finally {
   // whatever
}

if (!connectionError) {
    // talk to server.
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Why move this outside of the try block? What if another exception happens in your if block that requires finally to execute? –  Eric J. Jun 6 '12 at 20:56
1  
@EricJ. - certainly, there are any number of things that could happen, I was just going by his initial design. Obviously, there may be many other things to consider. Or maybe not. –  Erik Funkenbusch Jun 6 '12 at 20:58

Have another variable like clientConnected and set it to true right after Client.Connect(). Then outside the try-catch check for clientConnected before talking to the server.

Avoid doing everything in a single try-catch. You should use separate try-catch blocks for different actions that might throw exceptions, and catch specific exceptions as much as possible.

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Typically you use try...catch statements for those statements which you expect to throw an Exception. Try...Catch defines its own scope, so you should declare any variables outside of the Try...Catch block (at least, those variables that you want to use outside of it).

If you want to know if an exception was thrown, then define the Exception variable above the Try...Catch. You can then examine it to determine if it is Null or not.

System.Exception ex;
try {
  Client.connect();
} catch (ex) {
  // Do some exception handling...
} finally {
  // Do some cleanup...
}

if (ex != null){ ... }

// Talk to the server...  

You could log an event and then call some code to either try again or to cancel... or whatever you need to do.

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Use some type of flag variable to indicate whether server is connected or not. If your method is returning a boolean variable then also it is ok.

int flag=0;
while(flag==0){
   try {
       Client.connect();
       flag=1;
   } catch (System.Exception ex) {
   // Do some exception handling...
   } finally {
      // Do some cleanup...
   }
}

//If server connects code
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