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This is the function I use to bind 'tap' event on mobile devices. Basically a normal function.

bindTapEvent: function(container, selector, run, bindClickAlso){
    var startX, startY, currentX, currentY = 0;
    var moved = false;
    var self;

    if(touchDevice){
        container.on({
            click: function(e){
                e.preventDefault();
            },
            touchstart: function(e){
                e.preventDefault();
                self = $(this);
                startX = e.originalEvent.touches[0].pageX;
                startY = e.originalEvent.touches[0].pageY;
            },
            touchmove: function(e){
                currentX = e.originalEvent.touches[0].pageX;
                currentY = e.originalEvent.touches[0].pageY;
                if(Math.abs(startX - currentX) > 10 || Math.abs(startY - currentY) > 10){
                    moved = true;
                }
            },
            touchend: function(e){
                e.preventDefault();
                run();
            }
        }, 
        selector
        )
    } else {
        if(bindClickAlso != false){
            container.on('click', selector, function(){
                run();
            });
        }
    }
}

I make use of it like this:

tt.bindTapEvent(container, '.showColumns', function(){
    container.find('.column').addClass('visible');
    $(this).doSomething();
});

The only problem is that I cannot (obviously) user $(this) inside somtething like this. I've read about jQuery $.proxy that changes the context, but I cannot get to understand it so I can use it. Is it possible (in my case) to change the context of the anonymous function used in tt.bindTapEvent to that when I use $(this) it is 'stored' and 'used' only in the bindTapEvent function?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Take a look at .call() and .apply() which let you pass the desired context as the first parameter.

http://odetocode.com/blogs/scott/archive/2007/07/05/function-apply-and-function-call-in-javascript.aspx

so in your example instead of run() you could use run.call(this); so you're passing this as the context for the callback function.

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Thanks! Works perfectly. –  z-x Jun 10 '12 at 13:16

There's a bind function defined by the ES5 standard, and supported by all modern browsers (and shimmable for IE8 and below)

You call bind right on the function of your choice, and a new function will be returned.

The first parameter passed to bind is the object you'd like to be set to this inside of the resulting function, and subsequent arguments will be curried. So for your situation, just adding .bind(this) to the anonymous function should work.

tt.bindTapEvent(container, '.showColumns', function(){
    container.find('.column').addClass('visible');
    $(this).doSomething(); //should work now
}.bind(this));

More info on MDN

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Doesn't it collide with jQuery which has 'bind' as well? –  z-x Jun 7 '12 at 8:29
1  
No - this bind is called right on a function - jQuery's bind is, I assume, defined on the jQuery object itself. –  Adam Rackis Jun 7 '12 at 15:22
    
I understand. Seems great for the future, but mobile Safari lacks support for now. –  z-x Jun 10 '12 at 13:18
    
I feel that this is by far the best way to do it. –  mattblang Jul 1 '13 at 17:35

If you know about the this issue, I'd expected you to know about the .call and .apply methods, too :-)

You would need to call the run-function in context of the container, respectively of this in the listener functions:

e.preventDefault();
run.call(this, e);

BTW: You seem to declare and initialisize the var self, but use it nowhere?

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