Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is it possible to create an L-shaped border like this using only HTML and CSS?

An L-shaped border

Edit: That is what I have at the moment: http://jsfiddle.net/cBwh8/

Edit2: I'm looking to replicate the picture above -- appropriately curved round corners. This is the main reason I'm having difficulties here: http://jsfiddle.net/cBwh8/1/

share|improve this question
2  
Please post the HTML you have. It's possible, but how to do it depends on the context. –  Bojangles Jun 6 '12 at 21:15

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try this: worked for me

div.outer {
    margin: 10px;
    width: 200px;
    height: 200px;
    border: 1px solid blue;
    border-radius: 10px;
}

div.inner {
    width: 160px;
    height: 160px;
    border-right: 1px solid blue;
    border-bottom: 1px solid blue;
    margin-top:-1px;
    margin-left:-1px;
    background:#FFF;
}
share|improve this answer

Yes.

http://jsfiddle.net/HwKGx/1/

<div id="one">
    <div id="two">&nbsp;</div>
</div>   
#one {
    margin:10px;
    width:45px;
    height:75px;
    border:2px solid #333; }
#two{
    float:left;
    width:35px;
    height:65px;
    border-width:2px;
    border-style:solid;
    margin:-2px 0 0 -2px;
    border-color:#FFF #333 #333 #FFF;
}​
share|improve this answer
1  
Please also paste the code into the answer so that if JSFiddle goes down, the answer will still be useful in the future. –  Jcubed Jun 6 '12 at 21:28
    
This trick is good, done with the magic of negative margin! –  maksbd19 Jun 6 '12 at 21:30

Little bit tricky but had fun doing this

.left{float:left}
.right{float:right}
#container{border-right:1px solid #000;border-bottom:1px solid #000;width:300px;height:300px;margin:100px auto;}
#leftBox{width:70%;height:69%;border-right:1px solid #000;border-bottom:1px solid #000;}
#leftBox2{border-left:1px solid #000;width:100%;height:29%;}
#rightBox{width:29%;height:70%;border-top:1px solid #000;}

and the mark up

<div id="container">
<div id="leftBox" class="left"></div>
<div id="rightBox" class="right"></div>
<div id="leftBox2" class="left"></div>

share|improve this answer

A slightly more complex, but useful option:

http://dabblet.com/gist/2884899

This is two sibling elements, absolutely, and relatively positioned, z-indexed to overflow over one another. the top div hides the bottom div's topborder.

This is extra useful for drop down menus. (to have a bordered box, expand with a context menu)

EDIT( code pasted from link ):

HTML:

<div class="holder">
  <div class="top"></div>
  <div class="bottom"></div>
</div>

css:

.holder{    
  position:relative; 
}

.top{   
  width: 50px;  
  height:50px;
  background:red;
  border:blue solid 2px;
  border-bottom:none;
  position:relative;
  z-index:4;
} 

.bottom{
  z-index:2;
  width: 100px;
  height: 100px;
  position:absolute;
  top:50px;
  left:0;
  border: blue solid 2px;
  background:red;

}

share|improve this answer

For anyone interested, here's an L-Shaped set of Fieldsets:

JSFiddler code

HTML:

    <div>
        <fieldset class="topPortion">
            <legend>Some legend</legend>
            <input type="text" value="Foo" />
            <input type="submit" value="Submit" />
        </fieldset>
        <fieldset class="bottomPortion">        
            <input type="text" value="Foo" />
            <input type="submit" value="Submit" />
        </fieldset>
     </div>

CSS:

fieldset.topPortion 
{
border: 1px solid red;
border-bottom: 0;
/*top: 20px;*/
padding: 5px 5px;
position: relative;
width: 250px;
z-index: 100;
background-color: yellow;
top: 1px;
border-radius: 5px 5px 0 0;
}

fieldset.bottomPortion
{
border: 1px solid red;
width: 500px;
height: 100px;
position: absolute;
z-index: 1;
margin-top: -10;
padding: 5px 10px;
background-color: yellow;
border-radius: 0 5px 5px 5px;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.