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since this

(vb.net)

    Dim test As New List(Of Integer())
    test.Add(New Integer() {1, 2, 3})
    test.Add(New Integer() {1, 3, 3})
    test.Add(New Integer() {3, 2, 3})
    test.Add(New Integer() {1, 1, 3})
    test.Add(New Integer() {1, 2, 3})
    Dim a = test.Distinct

(c#)

    List<int[]> test = new List<int[]>();
    test.Add(new int[] { 1, 2, 3 });
    test.Add(new int[] { 1, 3, 3 });
    test.Add(new int[] { 3, 2, 3 });
    test.Add(new int[] { 1, 1, 3 });
    test.Add(new int[] { 1, 2, 3 });
    var a = test.Distinct();

does not work, how would you do the distinct?

share|improve this question
2  
Do you want distinct integers, distinct list (ordered), or distinct set (unordered)? –  Josh Smeaton Jun 6 '12 at 21:57
    
I would like the distinct to remove the first or last entry, in no specific order –  Fredou Jun 6 '12 at 21:58
1  
but does new int[]{1,2,3} equal new int[] {3,2,1} to you? –  Josh Smeaton Jun 6 '12 at 22:02
    
no, only { 1, 2, 3 } and { 1, 2, 3 } (first and last) –  Fredou Jun 6 '12 at 22:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You have to provide a custom Equality comparer for Distinct to work in this case - otherwise you are comparing references, here's an initial attempt:

class SequenceComparer<T,U> : IEqualityComparer<T> where T: IEnumerable<U>
{
    public bool Equals(T x, T y)
    {
        return Enumerable.SequenceEqual(x, y);
    }

    public int GetHashCode(T obj)
    {
        int hash = 19;
        foreach (var item  in obj)
        {
            hash = hash * 31 + item.GetHashCode();
        }
        return hash;
    }
}

Now you can use this in your call to Distinct():

var results = test.Distinct(new SequenceComparer<int[],int>())
                  .ToList();
share|improve this answer
    
An aside - what happens if hash ends up > int.Max? I know you'd have bigger problems comparing such large collections (performance), but it was the first thing that stuck out for me. Should you not be modding the result? –  Josh Smeaton Jun 6 '12 at 22:13
2  
@Josh This may overflow very fast, even for small collections. But since C# is unchecked by default, that isn’t a problem. If it’s compiled to be checked, put an unchecked block around the hash calculation. –  Konrad Rudolph Jun 6 '12 at 22:15
    
@JoshSmeaton: It will just roll over (negative number) which is not a problem - also collisions are expected for hash values, it just must be assured that equal items also produce the same hash value –  BrokenGlass Jun 6 '12 at 22:15
    
Ya know... not enough people think about GetHashCode... I have been recently for a genetic algorithm that may have a ton of repetitious data that I was going to use a modified Flyweight pattern for. –  jonnyGold Jun 7 '12 at 2:41

Use the Distinct overload where you can provide an IEqualityComparer and implement it to compare two lists.

Minimal implementation:

class ListComparer<T> : IEqualityComparer<List<T>> {
    public bool Equals(List<T> a, List<T> b) {
        if (a.Count != b.Count)
            return false;

        for (int i = 0; i < a.Count; i++)
            if (! a[i].Equals(b[i])
                return false;

        return true;
    }

    public int GetHashCode(List<T> a) {
        int ret = 11;
        unchecked {
            foreach (var x in a)
                ret = ret * 17 + x.GetHashCode();
        }
        return ret;
    }
}

But a real implementation should have a second constructor taking an IEqualityComparer<T> (among other things so that they can be nested used on nested lists).

share|improve this answer
    
Perhaps using SequenceEquals within the comparer: dotnetperls.com/sequenceequal –  Josh Smeaton Jun 6 '12 at 22:07
    
I assume it's to be used like this? var a = test.Distinct(new ListComparer<int[]>); but i'm getting this 'System.Collections.Generic.List<int[]>' does not contain a definition for 'Distinct' and the best extension method overload 'System.Linq.Queryable.Distinct<TSource>(System.Linq.IQueryable<TSource>, System.Collections.Generic.IEqualityComparer<TSource>)' has some invalid arguments –  Fredou Jun 6 '12 at 22:27
    
The question has a list of arrays, so the comparer should be a comparer of arrays, not of lists. –  svick Jun 6 '12 at 22:41
    
@Fredou I didn’t look properly and thought you had used lists. But that should have been trivial to adapt, by just replacing each instance of List<T> with T[]. –  Konrad Rudolph Jun 7 '12 at 6:51

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