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I know that in oracle/mysql/sqlserver select statement you are not able to reference a column alias in the where clause because it is executed before the select, yet it works in sqlite3:

sqlite> create table t (c1 text, c2 text);
sqlite> insert into t values ("a1", "a2");
sqlite> insert into t values ("b1", "b2");
sqlite> select c1, c2 from t;
a1|a2
b1|b2
sqlite> select c1, c2 as alias_c2 from t where alias_c2='b2';
b1|b2

Why is this possible in sqlite?

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2 Answers 2

So, from docs

Standard SQL doesn't allow you to refer to a column alias in a WHERE clause. This restriction is imposed because when the WHERE code is executed, the column value may not yet be determined.

but current SQLite allows it

SQL standard, column aliases can be referenced in ORDER BY, GROUP BY and HAVING clauses. As an extension, SQLite also allows them in WHERE and JOIN ON clauses, but again, such usage is non-standard (though very convenient at times). Neither the standard nor SQLite implementation allow referencing aliases in the SELECT clause.

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I don't think this is accurate, because this functionality is not provided as an external extension. –  Alex Jun 7 '12 at 13:38
    
I think that means an extension of the standard, not an extension of SQLite. –  DarkTygur Jul 28 '13 at 22:14
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Using sqlite3 with SQLITE_DEBUG flag enabled:

sqlite> create table x (x1 integer);
sqlite> insert into x values (1);
sqlite> insert into x values (2);
sqlite> insert into x values (3);
sqlite> insert into x values (4);
sqlite> insert into x values (5);
sqlite> pragma vdbe_listing=1;
VDBE Program Listing:
   0 Expire           0    0    0      00 
   1 Halt             0    0    0      00 
sqlite> select x1*x1 as s from x where s>-10 and s>-9 and s>0 and s>-4 and s>2;
VDBE Program Listing:
   0 Trace            0    0    0      00 
   1 Integer        -10    1    0      00 
   2 Integer         -9    2    0      00 
   3 Integer          0    3    0      00 
   4 Integer         -4    4    0      00 
   5 Integer          2    5    0      00 
   6 Goto             0   26    0      00 
   7 OpenRead         0    3    0 1    00 x
   8 Rewind           0   24    0      00 
   9 Column           0    0    7      00 x.x1
  10 Multiply         7    7    6      00 
  11 Le               1   23    6      6A 
  12 Multiply         7    7    6      00 
  13 Le               2   23    6      6A 
  14 Multiply         7    7    6      00 
  15 Le               3   23    6      6A 
  16 Multiply         7    7    6      00 
  17 Le               4   23    6      6A 
  18 Multiply         7    7    6      00 
  19 Le               5   23    6      6A 
  20 Column           0    0    6      00 x.x1
  21 Multiply         6    6    9      00 
  22 ResultRow        9    1    0      00 
  23 Next             0    9    0      01 
  24 Close            0    0    0      00 
  25 Halt             0    0    0      00 
  26 Transaction      0    0    0      00 
  27 VerifyCookie     0    4    0      00 
  28 TableLock        0    3    0 x    00 
  29 Goto             0    7    0      00 
s   
----
4   
9   
16  
25  
sqlite> 

As can be seen from the instruction stack above, the loop over the rows (lines 8-23) repeats the Multiply and Le commands for each expression in the where clause, for each row in the table.

So to answer my own question, sqlite engine is able to use the column aliases by substituting their definitions from the select at execution time of the where.

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