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Coming from a PHP background, I'm used to writing small functions that return a string (or the response from another function) like so:

function get_something(){
    return "foo";
}

However, I'm new to C and am trying to figure how to do some really fundamental things like this.

Can people review the following similar functions and tell me how they differ and which one is the best/cleanest to use?

char *get_foo(){
    char *bar;
    bar = "bar";
    return bar;
}

char *get_foo(){
    char *bar = "bar";
    return bar;
}

char *get_foo(){
    char *bar = NULL;
    bar = "bar";
    return bar;
}

char *get_foo(){
    return "bar";
}

Is there any difference between these functions or is this a style issue?

One other thing. If I have two functions and one calls the other, is this alright to do?

char *get_foo(){
    return "bar";
}

char *get_taz(){
    return get_foo();
}

UPDATE: How would these functions need to change if get_foo() did not return a const char*? What if get_foo() calls another function that has a char* of different lengths?

share|improve this question
    
I'm not sure this example is realistic, since it's hard-coded to return a value created at compile time. If get_foo has to create a string with potentially a different value each time, then this complicates things significantly. –  Steven Sudit Jul 7 '09 at 13:57
    
I'd rather define the functions as const char *get_foo (void) { return "foo"; } So that you force someone calling them to note that the pointed memory you're returning is constant. –  Metiu Jul 7 '09 at 16:46
    
It is perfectly ok for get_taz() to call get_foo(): you're just handing references to the "bar" string in memory from the callee to the caller, in fact the "bar" string has been allocated by the compiler at compile time. –  Metiu Jul 7 '09 at 16:48
    
@Metiu, right, if you don't return "const char*" then the caller can (accidentally?) modify the string literal, even by writing past the end of it. I'm still unclear on why foo would return a constant string; you might as well just reference a constant or even a define. I guess we should assume that foo is a simplification of a function that has different return values depending on the input. –  Steven Sudit Jul 7 '09 at 18:11

7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The four are equivalent, especially the first three ones - the compiler is likely to compile them to exactly the same code. So I'd go for the last one, for being smaller.

Having said that - you're returning a const char*, not a char*, so this particular code could break everything, depending on how you use it (if it compiles at all, which you can force anyway). The thing is, you're returing a pointer to a string that isn't dynamically allocated, but part of the executable image. So modifying it could be dangerous.

As a more general rule, never return a pointer to stuff allocated on the stack (ie not created using new or malloc) because as soon as the function ends, the scope of that variable also ends, gets destroyed, so you get a pointer to invalid (freed) memory.

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How would these functions need to change if get_foo() did not return a const char*? What if get_foo() calls another function that has a char* of different lengths? –  Adam Plumb Jul 7 '09 at 14:03
    
Just to be clear: He returns a char* each time. But the destination the pointer points to is not writable, because it points to a string literal's memory. A string literal in C is an array having type char[N] (with N being the length +1 for '\0'), so it does well with assigning to a char*. But you cannot write to it. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jul 8 '09 at 3:39

Differences like this will usually be optimized out by the compiler anyway ... I would vote for :

char *get_foo(){
    char *bar = "bar";
    return bar;
}

or

const char *get_foo(){
    return "bar";
}

or something along the lines of (but obviously more defensive, and on GNU system):

char *get_foo(){
    return strdup("bar");
}

Depending on future use and expansion of the function. Really, due to optimizations, it is a readability issue, and how you want the string (mutable/not) for future use.

Because you are initializing the variable to a constant in the data of the program. I would do things differently if I were creating a string dynamically.

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1  
All was going well until you chose to mention strdupa() - which uses alloca() to allocate the space, which means that the last example is simply wrong! –  Jonathan Leffler Jul 7 '09 at 13:47
    
Remind me, where is "bar" stored and what happens to that memory when the function returns? –  Key Jul 7 '09 at 13:47
1  
Using 'const' in the return type is important. –  Jonathan Leffler Jul 7 '09 at 13:48
    
@Key in most schemes the string literal "bar" is stored in the .text segment in memory. The "bar" doesn't disappear when the function returns. –  Aiden Bell Jul 7 '09 at 14:11

Like others already have stated, the compiler will produce likely the same code for the alternatives. But: are you forced to use C? Why not use C++ where you can use the std::string class. I haven't declared new char arrays for ages - too error-prone. You don't need to learn/master C before going to C++!

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2  
Personally, I would pick C over C++ for most tasks where I can choose. –  Aiden Bell Jul 7 '09 at 13:43
    
Why? C++ includes all of C. –  Steven Sudit Jul 7 '09 at 13:56
    
@Steven, or the C dialect of C++, doesn't matter. I would pick the C syntax over the C++ syntax. –  Aiden Bell Jul 7 '09 at 14:18
    
I'll ask why again. For performance, consider that standard C++ strings are typically faster than C strings because they include the length and therefore don't need to scan for the terminator. And when it comes to power of expression, C++ dwarfs C. –  Steven Sudit Jul 7 '09 at 18:09
    
Could be an embedded processor which doesn't have a C++ compiler for it. –  Steve Melnikoff Jul 7 '09 at 20:10

I'm always wary of return a pointer to a variable that exist on a lower scope level. When I first learned C some X-teen years ago, I can remember returning a pointer to a variable that was declared with local scope, before I called printf the debugger told me everything was normal but it never printed the right value. What was happening was: The variable was correct BEFORE the printf call, but when you call a function local variables get allocated on the stack, and deallocated upon return, so the variable that I had pointer to existed on the stack BEFORE calling printf and was the memory was reallocated to printf when the printf function was evoked thus overwritting the previous variables.

In your case the example you've given will assign a pointer to the constants table that is loaded as part of the executable and MIGHT be fine, depending on what else the actual program is doing, but I would recomend trying to keep the string at a higher level scope to prevent an easy bug from sneaking into your code as you tweek it. Based on the example you've given, you could probably have a string table allocated at the scope above this call, and just assign the variable instead of calling a function.

I.E.

#define FOO 0

#define BAR 1

#define FOOBAR 2

#define BARFOO 3

char *MyFooStrings[4] = {"Foo","Bar","FooBar","BarFoo"};

// Instead: myFoo = get_foo();

myFoo = MyFooStrings[FOO];

Pete

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Is there any difference between these functions or is this a style issue?

There is no difference in terms of output. As mentioned by others, the compiler will likely optimize the code anyway. My preference is to use:

char *get_foo(){
    char *bar = "bar";
    return bar;
}

If your return value gets to be more complex than a simple assignment, it helps to have the intermediate variable if you need to step through the code.

One other thing. If I have two functions and one calls the other, is this alright to do?

This is not a problem as long as you insure that the return types of the two functions are compatible.

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UPDATE: How would these functions need to change if get_foo() did not return a const char*? What if get_foo() calls another function that has a char* of different lengths?

get_taz() just has to have a return type that is assignment-compatible with get_foo(). For example, if get_foo() returns an int, then get_taz() has to return something that you can assign an int to - like int, long int, or similar.

A "char* of different lengths" doesn't really mean anything, because a "char *" doesn't really mean "string" - it means "the location of some chars". Whether that location holds three chars or thirty, a "char *" is still a "char *", so this is perfectly OK:

const char *get_zero(void)
{
    return "Zero";
}

const char *get_nonzero(void)
{
    return "The number is non-zero";
}

const char *get_n(int n)
{
    if (n == 0)
    {
        return get_zero();
    }
    else
    {
        return get_nonzero();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

First off, some of those will cause your program to crash.

The function:

 char *get_foo(){
    char *bar;
    bar = "bar";
    return bar;
}

Is incorrect C code (it may not crash, but you never know)

char *bar

allocates 1 pointers worth of memory on the stack.

Personally, I would do it like this.

1.

char *get_foo1(void) {
   char *bar;
   bar = malloc(strlen("bar")+1);
   sprintf(bar,"bar");
   return bar;
}

2. Or pass your allocated variable in.

   void get_foo2(char **bar) {
     sprintf(*bar,"bar);
   }
  1. combine 1 and 2, give user options

When working with strings in C, you almost always need to malloc() memory for usage. Unless the length of the strings are known ahead of time or are very small. Additionally, you can use #2 above to avoid memory allocation, like this

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
   char bar[4];
   get_foo2(&bar);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I downvoted, because the code you show at the top is perfectly valid C code. There is no reason why it might crash. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jul 8 '09 at 3:43
    
downvote b/c of malloc(strlen("bar")+1) and sprintf(bar,"bar"). And char** when char* would have sufficed in get_foo2. Way more complex than necessary. –  Tom Jul 8 '09 at 5:08

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