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I have the following issue: a list item that once clicked, a div slides up and changes opacity to 1. My goal is that on second click, the same div will get opacity 0.

I tried removing the original class and adding a new one, "selected" and then apply a click event on that. For some reason, the second part is not working. Any ideas?

$(document).ready(function () {
    $('li.slide1').click(function () {
        $("div#slidebox1").animate({
            opacity: .8,
            top: -200,

        }, 300);

        $("li.slide1").removeClass("slide1").addClass("selected");

    });

    $("li.selected").click(function () {

        $("div#slidebox1").animate({
            opacity: 0,

        }, 300);

    });
});
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Welcome to Stack Overflow. Please read the faq. It would be good if you'd invest more time into tidying up your question to be readable if you want people to assist. –  zzzzBov Jun 6 '12 at 22:52
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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You have to use .on() for jQuery 1.7+ or .live() jQuery 1.3+ because you add "selected" class when user click on li.slide1 and it does't exist before.

$(document).ready(function () {
    $('li.slide1').live('click',function () {
        $("div#slidebox1").animate({ opacity: .8, top: -200 }, 300);
        $(this).removeClass("slide1").addClass("selected");
    });

    $("li.selected").live('click', function () {
        $("div#slidebox1").animate({ opacity: 0 }, 300);
    });
});
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Thanks! Awesomeness. –  malicula Jun 6 '12 at 23:14
    
Short of using a very old version of jQuery, you shouldn't ever be using .live(). If you need to delegate events (that's what this process is called) then you should use the .delegate() function if you're prior to jQuery 1.7 and don't have access to .on(). –  Anthony Grist Jun 6 '12 at 23:18
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$("ul").on("click", "li.selected", function () {
   $("div#slidebox1").animate({ opacity:0},300);
});

Use on() to delegate your handling of the second click.

Your current code is setting up two click handlers on document.ready() - but since the li's don't have the class selected yet they don't have handlers applied to them. Using on() sets the handler to the ul, which catches the bubbling click event, and checks to see if it's target is li.selected and invokes your function.

Also, as gdoron is suggesting below, you could include binding a handler in the callback to your first function.

$('li.slide1').click(function () {
    $("div#slidebox1").animate({
        opacity: .8,
        top: -200
    }, 300, function(){
         $(this).one("click", function(){
            $("div#slidebox1").animate({opacity:0}, 300);
         });
    });

    $("li.slide1").removeClass("slide1").addClass("selected");
});
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Why? people here think on is the answer for every question, well it's not. –  gdoron Jun 6 '12 at 22:53
    
I don't see why this wouldn't work in this case. If you've got a better answer @gdoron, please, share it. Otherwise, is it so hard to make your comments constructive? –  ahren Jun 6 '12 at 22:56
    
P.s. The answer should be callback to the animate function. Edit: just did. –  gdoron Jun 6 '12 at 22:56
    
This is great, but it seems to 'take over' my first click event.so, when I click the item the first time, it slides up and then fades out. –  malicula Jun 6 '12 at 22:57
    
add return false; to your first click handler (at the end). This will stop the event from bubbling up to the ul. –  ahren Jun 6 '12 at 22:59
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