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I have a list of agents a = {a1, a2, a3,..., an}, in which each agent may be paired up with zero or more other agents. For example, for n = 6, I can have:

a1: a2, a3, a5
a2: a1, a3, a4
a3: a1, a2. a5
a4: a2
a5: a1, a3
a6:

Each pair interact with each other, and each agent obtains a value as the result of this interaction (e.g. they can play a game, but the details of interaction can be abstracted away here). I am interested in computing and storing the results of these interactions based on a given pairwise structure such as above.

Obviously, a naive algorithm would be to go through each agent and then compute the pairwise interaction with each of his interacting partners one-by-one. However, it is also obvious that this approach will duplicate some (or potentially many) computation. Using the example above:

by the time we finish for agent a1, we would've already obtained the results for (a1, a2), (a1, a3), and (a1, a5), thus rendering the later computation among these pairs redundant when we do it for agent a2, a3, and a5,

An improved algorithm would be to sort the input structure in an ascending order in both dimensions (i.e. along agents themselves and along their respective partners) as in the example above, so that for each agent (e.g. a3), we only need to compute for the interactions between this agent (a3) and the ones that are 'higher' than him (a5), since we know the interactions between himself and 'lower' partners ((a1, a3), (a2, a3)) have already been computed.

I wonder if there is different and better algorithm for this problem? By better, I mean more efficient computation in terms of both time and space.

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As soon as you sort something you've made the algorithm O(n log(n)), so lose to any O(n) implementation –  John La Rooy Jun 7 '12 at 1:18

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Yes this tries to add each pair to the set twice, but I feel that this may be more efficient than the conditional. Does anyone want to try timing the alternatives?

agents = {
    'a1': ['a2', 'a3', 'a5'],
    'a2': ['a1', 'a3', 'a4'],
    'a3': ['a1', 'a2', 'a5'],
    'a4': ['a2'],
    'a5': ['a1', 'a3'],
    'a6': []
}
pairs = {(k,v) for k in agents for v in agents[k]}

This is still O(n), so in terms of efficiency beats anything involving sorting

You'd probably get a minor speedup by using

pairs = {(k,v) for k,vs in agents.iteritems() for v in vs}
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My test shows your this version taking 0.4 seconds and my version taking 1.5 seconds for 100,000 iterations. Care to enlighten me as to why this version is so much faster? –  Trevor Jun 7 '12 at 5:00
    
@Trevor, The underlying C code that checks/adds the items in the set comprehension is very fast. –  John La Rooy Jun 7 '12 at 6:30
    
Aha, interesting. Thanks for the insight. –  Trevor Jun 7 '12 at 7:53
    
@gnibbler, thanks for the suggestions, but the above still produces duplicated interaction pairs, e.g. (a1, a2) as well as (a2, a1). –  MLister Jun 7 '12 at 14:43
    
you can do this: pairs = {frozenset(k,v) for k,vs in agents.iteritems() for v in vs} –  Amr Jun 7 '12 at 15:46

You can compare the agent ids with something like this:

agents = {
    'a1': ['a2', 'a3', 'a5'],
    'a2': ['a1', 'a3', 'a4'],
    'a3': ['a1', 'a2', 'a5'],
    'a4': ['a2'],
    'a5': ['a1', 'a3'],
    'a6': []
}

interactions = []
for agent, connections in agents.iteritems():
    interactions.extend((agent, connection) for connection in connections if agent < connection)

print interactions
# [('a1', 'a2'), ('a1', 'a3'), ('a1', 'a5'), ('a3', 'a5'), ('a2', 'a3'), ('a2', 'a4')]
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You don't need inner for loop: interactions.extend((agent, connection) for connection in connections if agent < connection). I updated your answer. –  spatar Jun 6 '12 at 23:51
    
And what if I have a different group of agents: a = {a1, a2, a3,..., an} and b = {b1, b2, b3,..., bm}, which can operate with each other? –  gahcep Jun 7 '12 at 0:13
    
so this is basically the improved version of algorithm as I outlined above? –  MLister Jun 7 '12 at 0:54

itertools to the rescue

>>> from itertools import combinations
>>> agents=['a1','a2','a3','a4','a5']
>>> list(combinations(agents, 2))
[('a1', 'a2'), ('a1', 'a3'), ('a1', 'a4'), ('a1', 'a5'), 
 ('a2', 'a3'), ('a2', 'a4'), ('a2', 'a5'),
 ('a3', 'a4'), ('a3', 'a5'),
 ('a4', 'a5')]
>>> 
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2  
He does not want to generate all possible pairs. He needs to transform his structure to non-repeating list of pairs. –  spatar Jun 6 '12 at 23:31
    
That is what the above does - transforms the structure agents into a non-repeating list of pairs. –  Nick Craig-Wood Jun 6 '12 at 23:35
    
@NickCraigWood, As far as I understood, the initial structure is something like this: a = { "a1": ["a2", "a3", "a5"], "a2": ["a1", "a3", "a4"], "a3": ["a1", "a2", "a5"], "a4": ["a2"], "a5": ["a1", "a3"], "a6": [] } –  spatar Jun 6 '12 at 23:36
    
@NickCraig-Wood, the pairwise-interaction structure input can be arbitrary. The example you provided would be a special case I suppose. –  MLister Jun 6 '12 at 23:40
    
I think you are right about the intent of the question, but also I think that combinations will provide the most efficient calculation of all the possible pairwise interactions which seems to be what the OP wants. I'll leave this answer for a bit just in case anyone else agrees, othewise I'll delete it! –  Nick Craig-Wood Jun 6 '12 at 23:41

As far as I understand your question, why don't you take into account a 2D matrix? At first stage, just set intersection cells equals to 1 if two agents can cooperate with each other. At second stage, just set a cycle around the matrix and calculate some values only between those agents, who has a interconnection (i.e. where cell is equal to 1). And instead of 1 there will be a real value. So in that case you don't need to do redundant calculations. The only redundant part is to fill calculated value twice in matrix.

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so you need to first populate this n x n matrix, and then iterate through each cell to find the ones with value 1, and then perform the computation for them. sounds like a lot of work to me. in addition, the result of each interaction computation should be two values, one for each interacting agent. –  MLister Jun 6 '12 at 23:48
    
A lot of work? You don't need to populate NxN matrix, just create a zero matrix and set its i,j & j,i elements to 1 or leave untouched while forming a set of agents pair. Then, yes, you need to iterate through half of matrix (notice, the matrix is symmetric in your case). And you can store any kind of elements in your cells. –  gahcep Jun 6 '12 at 23:59
    
BTW, I don't insist, the matrix approach is the best, just give you another point of view :) –  gahcep Jun 7 '12 at 0:00

Based on @gnibbler's answer, I come up with this:

agents = {
    'a1': ['a2', 'a3', 'a5'],
    'a2': ['a1', 'a3', 'a4'],
    'a3': ['a1', 'a2', 'a5'],
    'a4': ['a2'],
    'a5': ['a1', 'a3'],
    'a6': []
}

pairs = {tuple(sorted((k,v))) for k in agents for v in agents[k]}

Sorting is still needed but only restricted to a pair.

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