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I have 3 different classes(A, B, C) that each have a shared_ptr to a shared object(object X). What I want to do is to give object X information about who is pointing at it. For example, if there were no A objects pointing to it, it wouldn't need to calculate data that's only used by A classes when it is updated. And object X could keep a vector of pointers to the C objects that point at it so it can call a function on them when some data relevant to C objects has been updated(but the C objects still point at it to query other data from it).

What I was thinking of doing is creating a wrapper class for the shared_ptr on each class that would invoke pointers to functions on X whenever the wrapper is constructed/assigned/destructed(all of the same cases that increment/decrement the reference count on X). Here's the idea in code:

class A
{
public:
    A() : m_ptr(&X::IncrementACount, &X::DecrementACount) { }

    void SetX( const std::shared_ptr<X> &ptr ) { m_ptr = ptr; }
private:
    shared_ptr_wrapper0<X> m_ptr;
};

class B
{
public:
    B() : m_ptr(&X::IncrementBCount, &X::DecrementBCount) { }

    void SetX( const std::shared_ptr<X> &ptr ) { m_ptr = ptr; }
private:
    shared_ptr_wrapper0<X> m_ptr;
};

class C
{
public:
    C() : m_ptr(this, &X::StoreCPointer, &X::RemoveCPointer) { }

    void SetX( const std::shared_ptr<X> &ptr ) { m_ptr = ptr; }
private:
    shared_ptr_wrapper1<X, const C*> m_ptr;
};

Both A and B have a wrapped smart pointer with Increment/Decrement functions specified that take no arguments. When the wrapped smart pointer gets set/cleared/etc, those functions will be called on the X object it contains and increment/decrement the A/B counters.

C has a wrapped smart pointer with one argument(of type const C* ). When it gets set/cleared/etc, the functions on it will be called with the data that was stored on it by C's constructor(the this pointer) and will add or remove it from the vector on object X.

So my main question is this a good idea? Is there a better way to accomplish this idea of keeping track of who is pointing to an object? Is there a specific name for this kind of idea(I can't imagine I'm the first to try something like this, but I didn't find anything when searching for it so maybe I just don't know the right name to look for...)

Thank you.

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1  
This is incredibly silly, convoluted and what is it supposed to solve? –  Cat Plus Plus Jun 7 '12 at 1:38
    
If you're just keeping track if some objects of type A or B have references to objects of type C, I have to think that you could store a simple count of A or B objects that have references in the C object, and only the C object. Why should A and B have to keep track of that on behalf of C? –  sarnold Jun 7 '12 at 1:40
    
(Incidentally, I like the core idea of computing only what is necessary for clients of the objects; this specific implementation feels like it is keeping track of too much data in wrong places, but perhaps I've mis-read it.) –  sarnold Jun 7 '12 at 1:40
    
Are you looking for weak_ptr? The design could use some work as well. –  dirkgently Jun 7 '12 at 1:42
    
I think now that a better way of explaining where I was going is to say that we already have a ref count for object X that tells you how many objects point to it(from the shared_ptr), but that doesn't tell me all I wanted to know. I wanted to extend it to add two secondary ref counts that only count how many A/B objects are pointing at it, so I could check if either of them was zero. If there's a simpler way to accomplish that I'd be all for it. –  Dean Harris Jun 7 '12 at 4:43

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

A simpler approach would be observer pattern, aka publish/subscriber. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Observer_pattern. Your X object is the publisher and can offer 3 different interfaces to be observed. Your A, B, and C objects are the subscribers and they sign up to be notified of changes. Each Observer is responsible for adding and removing itself from X's subscription lists. When something changes in X, everyone on the appropriate subscription lists is notified via their interface.

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The example I gave for class C was supposed to be a case of the observer pattern. The shared_ptr_wrapper1 it uses subscribes to object X when it gets set, and unsubscribes when the pointer is cleared/C is destructed. Right? I'm not sure how the observer pattern would apply to class A/B though. The idea there as that I already have a refcount that tells me how many objects point to object X, I just wanted to extend that to add two secondary ref counts that track only how many A/B objects are pointing at it. Would there be a simpler way to achieve that secondary ref count idea? –  Dean Harris Jun 7 '12 at 4:34

Your problem is that the only object truly pointing to your A object is a smart pointer. So even though you could notify your object when the smart pointer is copied (search for intrusive pointer), there is no way to know who is doing the copying of the smart poitner, which is what you really want to know.

You need something like a pub/sub model.

The following is pseudo code, to give the idea, where we want to keep track of two different types of subscribers.

class A
{
private:
    std::vector<B&> subscriberB;
    std::vector<C&> subscriberC;

public:
    void Subscribe(const B& subscriber) { subscriberB.push_back(subscriber); }
    void Subscribe(const C& subscriber) { subscriberC.push_back(subscriber); }

    // An example of a function where the subscribing objects are notified.
    void SomeFunction()
    {
        // for each subscriber in subscriberB
        subscriber.SomeFunction();

        // for each subscriber in subscriberC
        subscriber.SomeOtherFunction();
    }

};

The above stores references, assuming the subscribers outlives the object they subscribe to. If not, you should put smart pointers in the vectors. Also, you might want to prevent the same object subscribing twice, or provide a method for unsubscribing.

If you want to 'force' objects of type B or C to be associated with A, you could make their constructor something like:

// B ctor
B::B(shared_ptr<A> aPtr)
{
    myPointerToA = aPtr;
    myPointerToA ->subscribe(*this);
}

Better still would be to use a factory method that creates B, and then hooks it up to A: this avoids dereferencing this in the constructor, which smells a bit.

A much more typical approach would be to have a single type of subscriber 'InterfaceSubscribeToA' that any class that wants to subscribe to A would implement. This depends completely on what you are trying to achieve, I just mention it in case you happen to be overcomplicating your particular problem!

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You can use an intrusive list. Make a class Base, and make A, B and C inherit that class. Also, the best technique is not to differentiate C from A and B, but to treat all observers the same way (what if you add D, with its special action, different from Cs ?). The Base class is perfect for that.

class Base
{
public:
    virtual void notifyXObjectChanged(/* data you want to pass*/) {}
    void setX(X* obj)
    {
        if(obj != object)
        {
            if(object)
                object->removeFromList(this);
            object = obj;
            if(object)
                object->addToList(this);
        }
    }

private:
    friend class X;
    X* object;
    Base* next;
    Base* previous;
};

And, in X:

class X
{
    // ...
public:
    void addToList(Base* obj)
    {
        if(first == 0 && last == 0)
        {
            // The list is empty
            first = last = obj;
            obj->previous = obj->next = 0;
        }
        else
        {
            // Add the object at the end of the list
            last->next = obj;
            obj->previous = last;
            obj->next = 0;
            last = obj;
        }
    }

    void removeFromList
    {
        // Code for removing an element in a list
    }

    void notify()
    {
        // iterate on the list
    }

private:
    Base* first;
    Base* last;
    // ...
};

Advantages:

  • very small memory overhead
  • very fast

Hope this helps

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