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I'm having a problem with pointers. Basically I have a struct which works as a linked list queue Pcb below.

struct pcb {
    pid_t pid;             // system process ID
    char * args[MAXARGS];  // program name and args
    int arrivaltime;
    int remainingcputime;
    struct pcb * next;     // links for Pcb handlers
    int priority, memalloc, res1, res2, res3, res4, status;
};
typedef struct pcb Pcb;
typedef Pcb * PcbPtr;

Now you can see I've typedef'ed the Pcb pointer as PcbPtr, meaning that PcbPtr is a pointer right?
Then I implemented these functions to add a PcbPtr to the queue, depending on its priority:

PcbPtr enqPcb(PcbPtr headofQ, PcbPtr process){
    PcbPtr c = headofQ;
    if (!headofQ) {
        headofQ = process;
        return headofQ;
    }
    while (c->next) {
        c = c->next;
    }
    c->next = process;
    return headofQ;
}

void priEnq(PcbPtr f1, PcbPtr f2, PcbPtr f3, PcbPtr a) {
    int pri = a->priority;
    if (pri == 3)
        enqPcb(f3, a);
    else if(pri == 2)
        enqPcb(f2, a);
    else 
        enqPcb(f1, a);
    return;
}

but it's not changing the object I'm pointing to (i.e. headf1 in this case:)

PcbPtr headi;
PcbPtr headf1; //priority 1
PcbPtr headf2; //priority 2
PcbPtr headf3; //priority 3
...
priEnq(headf1, headf2, headf3, headi);

so its as if I'm passing another object as the parameter. When I don't use priEnq(), it adds to the list just fine.

Any ideas what I'm doing wrong? Any help is much appreciated

SOLVED:

PcbPtr enqPcb(PcbPtr *headofQ, PcbPtr process){
    PcbPtr c = *headofQ;
    PcbPtr d = c;
    if (!*headofQ) {
        *headofQ = process;
        return *headofQ;
    }
    while (c->next) {
        c = c->next;
    }
    c->next = process;
    return headofQ;
}

void priEnq(PcbPtr *f1, PcbPtr *f2, PcbPtr *f3, PcbPtr a) {
    int pri = a->priority;
    if (pri == 3)
        enqPcb(f3, a);
    else if(pri == 2)
        enqPcb(f2, a);
    else 
        enqPcb(f1, a);
    return;
}

PcbPtr headi;
PcbPtr headf1; //priority 1
PcbPtr headf2; //priority 2
PcbPtr headf3; //priority 3
...
priEnq(&headf1, &headf2, &headf3, headi);
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If I understand your problem correctly, the caller of priEnq has pointers to the queues, and wants those pointers updated if the function changes the head of the queue.

The problem is that you're passing the pointers by value. If you want the called function to modify the caller's values, then you must pass by reference, ie, a pointer to the pointer you want updated. In code:

PcbPtr enqPcb(PcbPtr *headofQ, PcbPtr process){
    PcbPtr* c = headofQ;
    if (!*headofQ) {
        *headofQ = process;
        return *headofQ;
    }
    while (c->next) {
        c = c->next;
    }
    c->next = process;
    return headofQ;
}

void priEnq(PcbPtr *f1, PcbPtr *f2, PcbPtr *f3, PcbPtr a) {
    int pri = a->priority;
    if (pri == 3)
        enqPcb(f3, a);
    else if(pri == 2)
        enqPcb(f2, a);
    else 
        enqPcb(f1, a);
    return;
}

PcbPtr headi;
PcbPtr headf1; //priority 1
PcbPtr headf2; //priority 2
PcbPtr headf3; //priority 3
...
priEnq(&headf1, &headf2, &headf3, headi);

By passing the addresses of your queue pointers, you allow priEnq to modify your pointers, rather than just its own copies of them.

Also, as sarnold mentioned, you might want to consider an array of queue pointers for readability and maintainability.

share|improve this answer
    
That makes sense, thank you very much. Only thing now is, I cant access c->next since it is now a pointer to a pointer i.e. I get "request for member 'next' in something not a structure or union" How would I change my code to allow this? I really appreciate your help –  Milk Jun 7 '12 at 3:22
    
Sorry, Ignore above post. I changed "PcbPtr* c = headofQ;" to "PcbPtr c = *headofQ;" but now I'm getting "return from incompatible pointer type"....hmm –  Milk Jun 7 '12 at 3:30
    
I was about to suggest you solve your own problem as an exercise, then I saw you already had :). Similar advice applies to the return value problem though: consider the type of the expression in your return statement. How does it differ from the declared return type of your function? Sorry to get all pedagogical, but you did flag this as homework... –  John Auld Jun 7 '12 at 3:33
    
Yes silly question really. Of course I just changed return value to PcbPtr instead of PcbPtr*. Thanks again, I'll update OP with solution. –  Milk Jun 7 '12 at 3:39
    
Excellent first answer :) Good work. –  sarnold Jun 7 '12 at 21:20

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