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While making my way through the wonderful world of IndexedDB, I came across code like this from Mozilla's test suite:

/**
 * Any copyright is dedicated to the Public Domain.
 * http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/
 */

var testGenerator = testSteps();

function testSteps()
{
  const IDBObjectStore = Components.interfaces.nsIIDBObjectStore;
  const name = this.window ? window.location.pathname : "Splendid Test";
  const description = "My Test Database";

  var data = [
    { name: "inline key; key generator",
      autoIncrement: true,
      storedObject: {name: "Lincoln"},
      keyName: "id",
      keyValue: undefined,
    },
    { name: "inline key; no key generator",
      autoIncrement: false,
      storedObject: {id: 1, name: "Lincoln"},
      keyName: "id",
      keyValue: undefined,
    },
    { name: "out of line key; key generator",
      autoIncrement: true,
      storedObject: {name: "Lincoln"},
      keyName: undefined,
      keyValue: undefined,
    },
    { name: "out of line key; no key generator",
      autoIncrement: false,
      storedObject: {name: "Lincoln"},
      keyName: null,
      keyValue: 1,
    }
  ];

  for (let i = 0; i < data.length; i++) {
    let test = data[i];

    let request = mozIndexedDB.open(name, i+1, description);
    request.onerror = errorHandler;
    request.onupgradeneeded = grabEventAndContinueHandler;
    let event = yield;

    let db = event.target.result;

    let objectStore = db.createObjectStore(test.name,
                                           { keyPath: test.keyName,
                                             autoIncrement: test.autoIncrement });

    request = objectStore.add(test.storedObject, test.keyValue);
    request.onerror = errorHandler;
    request.onsuccess = grabEventAndContinueHandler;
    event = yield;

    let id = event.target.result;
    request = objectStore.get(id);
    request.onerror = errorHandler;
    request.onsuccess = grabEventAndContinueHandler;
    event = yield;

    // Sanity check!
    is(test.storedObject.name, event.target.result.name,
                  "The correct object was stored.");

    request = objectStore.delete(id);
    request.onerror = errorHandler;
    request.onsuccess = grabEventAndContinueHandler;
    event = yield;

    // Make sure it was removed.
    request = objectStore.get(id);
    request.onerror = errorHandler;
    request.onsuccess = grabEventAndContinueHandler;
    event = yield;

    ok(event.target.result === undefined, "Object was deleted");
    db.close();
  }

  finishTest();
  yield;
}

Their other tests are written in a similar style, as opposed to the typical "pyramid of doom" style you see with IndexedDB due to asynchronous callbacks being stacked together (and, of course, generators aren't widely supported beyond Firefox..).

So, this code from Mozilla is somewhat appealing and intriguing to me as it looks very clean, but I'm not totally sure what yield is doing in this context. Can anyone help me understand this?

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what kind of detail can i provide? –  buley Jun 10 '12 at 17:02
    
I'm not entirely sure. I still don't really understand what's going on. For reference, here is where grabEventAndContinueHandler is defined. Is that somehow saying "when you get to the yield line, wait until the event is finished"? How? –  dumbmatter Jun 10 '12 at 19:05
    
Also, thanks for your original answer and your other IndexedDB answers here. You're one of the few people in the world actually writing about how it should be used, it seems. –  dumbmatter Jun 10 '12 at 19:06
1  
When the yield keyword is encountered the generator is suspended until the next or the send method is called on it. The send method takes a single argument and resumes the generator sending the given argument to the generator. The next method is the same as the send method except that it always sends the value undefined to the generator. The grabEventAndContinueHandler simply resumes the generator and sends it the event it received, which is caught in the generator by the statement var event = yield;. –  Aadit M Shah Jun 15 '12 at 5:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
+50

This is a brilliant piece of code which leverages the powerful new features of JavaScript 1.7 exposed by Firefox, and since IndexedDB is only supported by Firefox and Chrome I'd say that it's an excellent trade off.

The first line of the code creates a generator from the function testSteps and assigns it to the variable testGenerator. The reason we are using generators is because IndexedDB is a purely asynchronous API; and asynchronous programming and nested callbacks are a pain. Using generators eases this pain by allowing you to write asynchronous code that looks synchronous.

Note: If you want to know how to leverage the power of generators to make asynchronous code synchronous read the following article.

To explain how generators are useful to make asynchronous programming bearable consider the following code:

var name = "Test";
var version = 1.0;
var description = "Test database.";

var request = mozIndexedDB.open(name, version, description);

request.onupgradeneeded = function (event) {
    var db = event.target.result;

    var objectStore = db.createObjectStore("Thing", {
        keyPath: "id",
        autoIncrement: true
    });

    var object = {
        attributeA: 1,
        attributeB: 2,
        attributeC: 3            
    };

    var request = objectStore.add(object, "uniqueID");

    request.onsuccess = function (event) {
        var id = event.target.result;
        if (id === "uniqueID") alert("Object stored.");
        db.close();
    };
};

In the above code we requested for a database named Test. We requested for the database version 1.0. Since it didn't exist the onupgradeneeded event handler was fired. Once we got the database we created an object store on it, added an object to the object store, and after it was saved we closed the database.

The problem with the above code is that we are requesting for the database and doing other operations related to it asynchronously. This could make the code very difficult to maintain as more and more nested callbacks are employed.

To solve this problem we use generators as follows:

var gen = (function (name, version, description) {
    var request = mozIndexedDB.open(name, version, description);

    request.onupgradeneeded = grabEventAndContinueHandler;

    var event = yield;

    var db = event.target.result;

    var objectStore = db.createObjectStore("Thing", {
        keyPath: "id",
        autoIncrement: true
    });

    var object = {
        attributeA: 1,
        attributeB: 2,
        attributeC: 3
    };

    request = objectStore.add(object, "uniqueID");

    request.onsuccess = grabEventAndContinueHandler;

    event = yield;

    var id = event.target.result;

    if (id === "uniqueID") alert("Object stored.");

    db.close();
}("Test", 1.0, "Test database."));

The grabEventAndContinueHandler function is defined after the generator as follows:

function grabEventAndContinueHandler(event) {
    gen.send(event);
}

The generator is started as follows:

gen.next();

Once the generator is started a request is made to open a connection to the given database. Then grabEventAndContinueHandler is attached as an event handler to the onupgradeneeded event. Finally we yield or pause the generator using the keyword yield.

The generator is automatically resumed when the gen.send method is called from the grabEventAndContinueHandler function. This function simply takes a single argument called event and sends it to the generator. When the generator is resumed the sent value is stored in a variable called event.

To recap, the magic happens here:

// resume the generator when the event handler is called
// and send the onsuccess event to the generator
request.onsuccess = grabEventAndContinueHandler;

// pause the generator using the yield keyword
// and save the onsuccess event sent by the handler
var event = yield;

The above code makes it possible to write asynchronous code as if it were synchronous. To know more about generators read the following MDN article. Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
1  
Great explanation! One thing to point out is that "yield" doesn't really "stop" or "pause" execution. It simply returns to the gen.send() or gen.next() call. The cool part is of course that you continue the execution by calling gen.send() or gen.next() again. Even cooler is that yield works inside if-statements and loop constructs. That makes it easy to write a loop which loops asynchronously over a cursor. One thing to watch out for though is that the syntax that Firefox uses likely will not 100% match the syntax that ES6 will standardize. We'll of course update to follow the spec. –  Jonas Sicking Jul 15 '12 at 19:37

The grabEventAndContinueHandler() is littered all over the place in the IDB tests in the Mozilla codebase, but I can't find a definition beyond a couple of these:

function grabEventAndContinueHandler(event) {
  testGenerator.send(event);
} 

Without a function definition I can't say what it does but I'd have to guess they're part of the test suite and pass event messages as these other ones do. yield appears to be a global, perhaps which passes results back from the test suite from inside its grabEventAndContinueHandler().


I would guess that yield here is just a global object that gets set in grabEventAndContinueHandler with the event result from the createObjectStore, objectStore.add() and objectStore.get invocations.

In case it's helpful, I'll give you some background on the use of the yield concept in Ruby. It's sort of like a map() -- it's a keyword that passes messages back to a "block" of code outside of the iterator.

I can't say what yield doing here with certainty (it doesn't seem to be a function), but here's a shot based on my knowledge of IndexedDB.

Given this deals with IDB, I know the yield object here contains the event object (let event = yield), an object which contains the event.target.result attribute.

Since that event attribute only comes from an onsuccess callback, and here request.onsuccess = grabEventAndContinueHandler, I can guess that grabEventAndContinueHandler is the equivalent of the "block" of code and the resulting event object is "yielded" back to the main thread by setting this global object.

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