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What event system for Python do you use? I'm already aware of pydispatcher, but I was wondering what else can be found, or is commonly used?

I'm not interested in event managers that are part of large frameworks, I'd rather use a small bare-bones solution that I can easily extend.

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8 Answers 8

up vote 28 down vote accepted

Wrapping up the various event systems that are mentioned in the answers here:

The most basic style of event system is the 'bag of handler methods', which is a simple implementation of the Observer pattern. Basically, the handler methods (callables) are stored in an array and are each called when the event 'fires'.

  • zope.event shows the bare bones of how this works (see Lennart's answer). Note: this example does not even support handler arguments.
  • LongPoke's 'callable list' implementation shows that such an event system can be implemented very minimalistically by subclassing list
  • spassig's EventHook (Michael Foord's Event Pattern) is a straightforward implementation.
  • Josip's Valued Lessons Event class is basically the same, but uses a set() instead of a list to store the bag, and implements __call__ which are both reasonable additions.
  • PyNotify is similar in concept and also provides additional concepts of variables and conditions ('variable changed event').
  • axel is basically a bag-of-handlers with more features related to threading, error handling, ...

The disadvantage of these event systems is that you can only register the handlers on the actual Event object (or handlers list). So at registration time the event already needs to exist.

That's why the second style of event systems exists: the publish-subscribe pattern. Here, the handlers don't register on an event object (or handler list), but on a central dispatcher. Also the notifiers only talk to the dispatcher. What to listen for, or what to publish is determined by 'signal', which is nothing more than a name (string).

  • PyPubSub at first sight seems to be pretty straightforward; apparently does not yet support Python3
  • PyDispatcher seems to emphasize flexibility with regards to many-to-many publication etc.
  • (and Qt's signals and slots are available from PyQt or PySide)
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1  
You are correct about PyPubSub: does not yet support Python3. It's on my list of things to do (sourceforge.net/p/pubsub/tasks). –  Schollii Aug 12 '13 at 22:19

We use an EventHook as suggested from Michael Foord in his Event Pattern:

Just add EventHooks to your classes with:

class MyBroadcaster()
    def __init__():
        self.onChange = EventHook()

theBroadcaster = MyBroadcaster()

# add a listener to the event
theBroadcaster.onChange += myFunction

# remove listener from the event
theBroadcaster.onChange -= myFunction

# fire event
theBroadcaster.onChange.fire()

We add the functionality to remove all listener from an object to Michaels class and ended up with this:

class EventHook(object):

    def __init__(self):
        self.__handlers = []

    def __iadd__(self, handler):
        self.__handlers.append(handler)
        return self

    def __isub__(self, handler):
        self.__handlers.remove(handler)
        return self

    def fire(self, *args, **keywargs):
        for handler in self.__handlers:
            handler(*args, **keywargs)

    def clearObjectHandlers(self, inObject):
        for theHandler in self.__handlers:
            if theHandler.im_self == inObject:
                self -= theHandler
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A drawback of using this is that you need to first add an event before you register as a subscriber. If only the publishers add their events (not a must, just a good practice), then you must initialize the publishers before the subscribers which is a pain in large projects –  Jonathan Jul 4 '11 at 16:57
6  
the last method is bugged because self.__handlers is modified during the iterations. Fix: ` self.__handlers = [h for h in self.__handlers if h.im_self != obj]` –  Simon Apr 1 '13 at 7:03

I've been doing it this way:

class Event(list):
    """Event subscription.

    A list of callable objects. Calling an instance of this will cause a
    call to each item in the list in ascending order by index.

    Example Usage:
    >>> def f(x):
    ...     print 'f(%s)' % x
    >>> def g(x):
    ...     print 'g(%s)' % x
    >>> e = Event()
    >>> e()
    >>> e.append(f)
    >>> e(123)
    f(123)
    >>> e.remove(f)
    >>> e()
    >>> e += (f, g)
    >>> e(10)
    f(10)
    g(10)
    >>> del e[0]
    >>> e(2)
    g(2)

    """
    def __call__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        for f in self:
            f(*args, **kwargs)

    def __repr__(self):
        return "Event(%s)" % list.__repr__(self)

However, like with everything else I've seen, there is no auto generated pydoc for this, and no signatures, which really sucks.

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1  
I find this style rather intriguing. It's sweetly bare-bones. I like the fact that it allows one to manipulate events and their subscribers as autonomous operations. I'll see how it fares in a real project. –  Rudy Lattae Dec 31 '10 at 8:25
    
Very beautiful minimalistic style! super! –  akaRem Feb 8 '13 at 14:35
    
I can't upvote this enough, this is really straightforward and easy. –  Stick Apr 3 at 19:20

I use zope.event. It's the most bare bones you can imagine. :-) In fact, here is the complete source code:

subscribers = []

def notify(event):
    for subscriber in subscribers:
        subscriber(event)

Note that you can't send messages between processes, for example. It's not a messaging system, just an event system, nothing more, nothing less.

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6  
pypi.python.org/pypi/zope.event ...to save the poor Google some bandwith ;-) –  Boldewyn Jul 7 '09 at 15:03
    
I'd still like to be able to send messages. I'd be using the event system in application built on Tkinter. I'm not using it's event system because it doesn't support messages. –  Josip Jul 8 '09 at 7:24
    
You can send whatever you want with zope.event. But my point is that it's not a proper messaging system, as you can't send events/messages to other processes or other computers. You should probably be a but more specific with your requirements. –  Lennart Regebro Jul 8 '09 at 9:48

I found this small script on Valued Lessons. It seems to have just the right simplicity/power ratio I'm after. Peter Thatcher is the author of following code (no licensing is mentioned).

class Event:
    def __init__(self):
        self.handlers = set()

    def handle(self, handler):
        self.handlers.add(handler)
        return self

    def unhandle(self, handler):
        try:
            self.handlers.remove(handler)
        except:
            raise ValueError("Handler is not handling this event, so cannot unhandle it.")
        return self

    def fire(self, *args, **kargs):
        for handler in self.handlers:
            handler(*args, **kargs)

    def getHandlerCount(self):
        return len(self.handlers)

    __iadd__ = handle
    __isub__ = unhandle
    __call__ = fire
    __len__  = getHandlerCount

class MockFileWatcher:
    def __init__(self):
        self.fileChanged = Event()

    def watchFiles(self):
        source_path = "foo"
        self.fileChanged(source_path)

def log_file_change(source_path):
    print "%r changed." % (source_path,)

def log_file_change2(source_path):
    print "%r changed!" % (source_path,)

watcher              = MockFileWatcher()
watcher.fileChanged += log_file_change2
watcher.fileChanged += log_file_change
watcher.fileChanged -= log_file_change2
watcher.watchFiles()
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Using a set() instead of a list is nice to avoid handlers being registered twice. One consequence is that the handlers are not being called in the order they were registered. Not necessarily a bad thing though... –  florisla Apr 24 '13 at 14:53

If I do code in pyQt I use QT sockets/signals paradigm, same is for django

If I'm doing async I/O I use native select module

If I'm usign a SAX python parser I'm using event API provided by SAX. So it looks like I'm victim of underlying API :-)

Maybe you should ask yourself what do you expect from event framework/module. My personal preference is to use Socket/Signal paradigm from QT. more info about that can be found here

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Here's another module for consideration. It seems a viable choice for more demanding applications.

Py-notify is a Python package providing tools for implementing Observer programming pattern. These tools include signals, conditions and variables.

Signals are lists of handlers that are called when signal is emitted. Conditions are basically boolean variables coupled with a signal that is emitted when condition state changes. They can be combined using standard logical operators (not, and, etc.) into compound conditions. Variables, unlike conditions, can hold any Python object, not just booleans, but they cannot be combined.

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I created an EventManager class (code at the end). The syntax is the following:

#Create an event with no listeners assigned to it
EventManager.addEvent( eventName = [] )

#Create an event with listeners assigned to it
EventManager.addEvent( eventName = [fun1, fun2,...] )

#Create any number event with listeners assigned to them
EventManager.addEvent( eventName1 = [e1fun1, e1fun2,...], eventName2 = [e2fun1, e2fun2,...], ... )

#Add or remove listener to an existing event
EventManager.eventName += extra_fun
EventManager.eventName -= removed_fun

#Delete an event
del EventManager.eventName

#Fire the event
EventManager.eventName()

Here is an Example:

def hello(name):
    print "Hello {}".format(name)

def greetings(name):
    print "Greetings {}".format(name)

EventManager.addEvent( salute = [greetings] )
EventManager.salute += hello

print "\nInitial salute"
EventManager.salute('Oscar')

print "\nNow remove greetings"
EventManager.salute -= greetings
EventManager.salute('Oscar')

Output:

Initial salute
Greetings Oscar
Hello Oscar

Now remove greetings
Hello Oscar

EventManger Code:

class EventManager:

    class Event:
        def __init__(self,functions):
            if type(functions) is not list:
                raise ValueError("functions parameter has to be a list")
            self.functions = functions

        def __iadd__(self,func):
            self.functions.append(func)
            return self

        def __isub__(self,func):
            self.functions.remove(func)
            return self

        def __call__(self,*args,**kvargs):
            for func in self.functions : func(*args,**kvargs)

    @classmethod
    def addEvent(cls,**kvargs):
        """
        addEvent( event1 = [f1,f2,...], event2 = [g1,g2,...], ... )
        creates events using **kvargs to create any number of events. Each event recieves a list of functions,
        where every function in the list recieves the same parameters.

        Example:

        def hello(): print "Hello ",
        def world(): print "World"

        EventManager.addEvent( salute = [hello] )
        EventManager.salute += world

        EventManager.salute()

        Output:
        Hello World
        """
        for key in kvargs.keys():
            if type(kvargs[key]) is not list:
                raise ValueError("value has to be a list")
            else:
                kvargs[key] = cls.Event(kvargs[key])

        cls.__dict__.update(kvargs)
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