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I'm sorry if I didn't pick a descriptive or concise name. A lot of questions sound similar, but I haven't been able to find what I'm looking for. What I want to do is store a 2D array of pointers somewhere and assign a variable in some object to that array to be able to access it.

Here's some example code that has the same compile error I'm getting with a bigger project.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
struct X{
    float n, * b[8][8];
    X(){
        n = 1;
        b[1][5] = &n;
        cout << *(b[1][5]) << endl;
    }
    void Set(float * c[8][8]){
        b = c;
        cout << *(b[1][5]) << endl;
    }
};
main(){
    float m, * a[8][8];
    m = 2;
    a[1][5] = &m;
    X obj;
    obj.Set(a);
}

What I want to happen in this code is that an X object starts with its own 2D array, whose value pointed to by b[1][5] should be printed as "1". Then the main method's 2D array, a, is passed to the object's Set() method and assigned to its array variable. The value pointed to by b[1][5] should then be printed as "2".

However, I can't figure out what type the Set() parameter, c, should be. I get

error: incompatible types in assignment of ‘float* (*)[8]’ to ‘float* [8][8]’

when I try to compile. As for why I want to do this, I'm trying to use an array of pointers to objects, not floats, but it's the same error.

share|improve this question
2  
You have a problem with pointers here: You have an array of arrays of pointers, but you don't set the pointer to point to anything. You do however assign a value to the location of this uninitialized pointer, which results in so called undefined behavior. –  Joachim Pileborg Jun 7 '12 at 4:47
    
Whoops, thanks. Edited. –  MrMormon Jun 7 '12 at 5:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try this:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
struct X{
    float n;
    float* (*b)[8];
    X(){
        n = 1;
        b = new float*[8][8];
        b[1][5] = &n;
        cout << *(b[1][5]) << endl;
    }
    void Set(float * c[8][8]){
        delete[] b;
        b = c;
        cout << *(b[1][5]) << endl;
    }
};
main(){
    float m, * a[8][8];
    m = 2;
    a[1][5] = &m;
    X obj;
    obj.Set(a);
}

Here, X stores a pointer to a 1D array, which we are treating as a pointer to the first element of a 2D array - i.e. as just a 2D array.

In X's constructor, X allocates its own array with new and sets its pointer to point to that. When calling Set(), X deletes its own array, and sets its pointer to point to the array provided by the caller.

The only thing to watch out for is, if you call Set() again, that array will in turn be deleted (which will blow up if that array is a stack array, like in this case). So, it might be advisable to separate the line that does delete[] b into its own member function, and call it only when necessary.

share|improve this answer
    
I'd vote this up, but I don't have enough reputation yet. That's a weird way to declare b, but it works! Thanks a lot. –  MrMormon Jun 7 '12 at 5:54
    
Now I have enough. There you go. –  MrMormon Jun 7 '12 at 6:18
1  
@MrMormon: The type of b here is [pointer-to]-[array-of-8]-[pointers-to]-[float]. The parentheses are necessary because float** b[8] would be [array-of-8]-[pointers-to]-[pointers-to]-[float]. See the difference? (Note that spaces make no difference). –  HighCommander4 Jun 7 '12 at 6:21
    
Parentheses can change the "pointer chain" order, got it. Confusing if you don't know that, powerful if you do, I guess. –  MrMormon Jun 7 '12 at 6:24

Your problem with set is that you need to copy the array contents - just doing b=c can't do what you want.

void Set(float * c[8][8]){
    for(unsigned int i=0; i<8; ++i) {
      for(unsigned int j=0; j<8; ++j) {
        b[i][j] = c[i][j];
      }
    }
    cout << *(b[1][5]) << endl;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I don't want a copy, though. I want access to the one in the main method. –  MrMormon Jun 7 '12 at 4:37
    
@MrMormon: That's inconsistent with your desire that "an X object starts with its own 2D array". An X object either stores an actual 2D array, or just a pointer to a 2D array that's stored elsewhere. If the former, you need to copy the array in Set(). If the latter, then an X object can't start with it's own 2D array. –  HighCommander4 Jun 7 '12 at 4:58
    
Sorry. What I meant is that X obviously needs an array variable if it's going to be able to access the array in main(). I'm really trying to avoing using a pointer to an array. That adds (*array) everywhere. –  MrMormon Jun 7 '12 at 5:00
    
@MrMormon: So copying the array in Set() solves your problem, right? –  HighCommander4 Jun 7 '12 at 5:04
1  
@MrMormon: float a[1], b[1]; b = a; fails to compile with GCC 4.6 with the error invalid array assignment. Earlier versions of GCC may have allowed this, but what they did for it is copy the array element-by-element. –  HighCommander4 Jun 7 '12 at 5:35

There are several bugs I think.. Firstly, in Set() function you have assigned an array name. But array name should not be used as a variable. You can solve this by making 2D array of pointer b as a pointer to 1D array of pointer like float * (*b)[8]...

Secondly, when you send the 2D array of pointer as argument of Set() function it is decaying into a pointer to 1D array of pointer i.e something like this float *(*a)[8]. so you have to make the formal argument of Set() function a pointer to 1D array of pointers like void Set(float * (*c)[8])...

And finally there is a thing your float variable m inside main is a local to main , so when control pass to Set() function I think the compiler cant find the value(may be deallocated) in the m...so it outputs undefined or give run time error..you can solve this by making m a static version. i.e by declaring static float m...

In total make your code like following :

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
struct X{
    float n, *(*b)[8];
    X(){
        n = 1;
        b[1][5] = &n;
        cout << *(b[1][5]) << endl;
    }
    void Set(float * (*c)[8]){
        b = c;
        cout << *(b[1][5]) << endl;
    }
};
main(){
    float * a[8][8];
    static float m;
    m = 2;
    a[1][5] = &m;
    X obj;
    obj.Set(a);
}

This will output correctly :)

share|improve this answer
    
The problem here is that X's constructor does not actually set b to point to anything. On the line b[1][5] = &n;, you are accessing and writing to garbage memory. See my answer for how I avoid that problem. –  HighCommander4 Jun 7 '12 at 5:52
    
I have made m static and no explicit memory allocation and it is working in my GNU compiler..if you make m global then also working.. then how it is working? in line b[1][5]=&n , b is pointing to n which is assigned value 1 previously. The main problem here was in with assignment of pointer array and i have explained it in my post ...:) –  amin__ Jun 7 '12 at 6:05
    
I get a segfault. Platform-dependent undefined behavior, probably. –  MrMormon Jun 7 '12 at 6:12
    
The problem is not with the = &n part, it's with the b[1][5] part. b itself doesn't point to anything yet, so even doing b[1] is undefined behaviour. –  HighCommander4 Jun 7 '12 at 6:18
    
sorry brother please explain it for me. I am thinking he is pointing to something by executing statement b[1][5] = &n. I am sure, I am missing what you want to clarify.. –  amin__ Jun 7 '12 at 6:26

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